Into the forest

During the past year Dan and I have visited sheep owners to take photos of Swedish sheep breeds for my book, Listen to the Wool. Today I invite you into the forest for a photo shoot of a forest breed, Åsen sheep.

Dan and I go to see Milis and her 24 Åsen sheep. The breed used to be bundled with Gestrike, Helsinge, Värmland and Svärdsjö sheep as skogsfår, forest sheep, but since the end of the 20th century they are all considered individual breeds.

Into the forest we go

Milis keeps half of her Åsen flock in the forest a ten minute drive from her house. The forest belongs to Per who wants it grazed. When we get there we are struck by the openness of the forest – the understory and the forest floor are light and airy and the light magical.

Per takes the lead with a bucket full of bribes as we walk along paths the sheep have paved through the vegetation. Silently, as not to scare the sheep who become nearly wild during the summer, we wade through waist high fern and duck under hazel branches.

A man taking photos of grey sheep in the forest.
The Åsen sheep stand patiently while Dan gets some lovely photos of them.

After ten minutes into the forest we come to a hill with a collection of stones, rounder than the ones we have passed on the way and in all shades of grey. Curious black heads rise from between them, and we realize the stones are the sheep themselves. They see Per and know it means treats, but they also see Dan and stay, linger. Dan is used to lingering sheep by now and has his telephoto lens ready. They flaunt their clean and shiny fleeces and Dan gets beautiful shots despite the distance. When he has what he needs Per offers his bribes to the flock and they tumble around the bucket, toss it into the air and empty it in seconds. We walk back in silence, all I can hear is my heart tingling.

For the love of wool

Milis has decades of experience as a spinner and bought her sheep 24 years ago for the sake of their wool. She documents the wool meticulously and uses it all herself, mostly for weaving. That means the fleeces of 24 sheep twice a year. We talk about the treasure that her wool is, about all the work that is put into its quality. Milis and her husband have changed the way they feed the sheep during the winter, to keep the food out of the fleeces. When I look at the wall of baskets full of wool I see no sign of vegetation matter in the flora of greys. All I can see is the treasure her wool is and the love, skill and dedication she has put into it.

Singing the song of wool

Just as the other Swedish heritage breeds, wool from Åsen sheep can be very versatile, between flocks and individuals as well as over the body of the same sheep. The quality also differs between seasons and years. Usually they grow quite a lot of undercoat during the winter to keep the body warm. At the same time, the wool can be of lower quality due to pregnancies, but this year the sheep haven’t been served by the ram and all the nutrients have gone to the sheep themselves. This year’s spring shearing is spectacular with its abundance of airy undercoat, glistening with lanolin.

Raw sampels from four of Milis’ spring shorn Åsen sheep. She says these have a lot more undercoat than the autumn shorn wool.

I get to take samples from four fleeces and I treasure them like diamonds. As I write this piece, the sheepy smell fills the room and my heart with a song that only a spinner can hear.

Tack Milis!

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

A Spindle a Day 5

Last week I taught a five-day course in spindle spinning at Sätergläntan Institute of sloyd and craft. Today I invite you to a peek at A Spindle a Day 5!

For the past year I have turned down every request for teaching to focus my energy on writing my book, Listen to the wool. The five-day course at Sätergläntan is the exception, and I have looking forward to it immensely.

Words and more words

The two to three days a week when I work from my home office I have been writing before work, from 6.30 am to 7, plus a couple of hours on the weekend. In May I started a seven-week writing course that demanded even more of my time, but was incredibly nourishing for my writing. Our son moved into his own apartment and our daughter graduated from upper secondary school and the spring has been busy to say the least. I haven’t had the time or the energy to spin for the past few months.

A woman weaving a narrow band on a backstrap loom in a room with natural light.
It always feels good to be back at Sätergläntan, but perhaps especially this year. The magazine room where I’m weaving has the most beautiful light in the morning just before breakfast.

Coming to Sätergläntan to teach has been the spinning reward after months of not spinning. The course wouldn’t be without writing, though. The chapter that was next in line was a very good match for teaching – a section where I talk about the importance of talking, of using spinning vocabulary and of referring back to the terms we have established during the course.

A table with samples of carded rolls in progression, and small skeins and balls of handspun yarn.
The progression of rolag making! And some beautifully and blissfully spun yarns at the top.

When the students were practicing I made notes of their questions, their struggles and successes and how I could meet them where they are. There was so much to reflect over in the classroom. And it was such a treat to get to teach again, be among other spinners and to hold the tools in my hands. I had spent so much time spinning in my head for the book and felt truly nourished in the company of spinners and spindles.

A Spindle a Day

The course is an immersion in wool preparation and spindles, we focus on one spindle type a day for four days – suspended, supported, in-hand and floor spindles, and prepare all the wool we spin with combs and cards. Every new day builds on the previous days in every aspect except for the specific technique of the spindle type for the day. By the fourth spindle they don’t really need much introduction, they know all the parts by now and just need to translate them to a different model.

On the fifth day the students get to do a wool tasting, where they get to explore five different wools for fifteen minutes each, with combs, cards, hands and spindles, all individually and in silence. The very last thing we do before we go back home is a spinning meditation, which usually is very appreciated. This year was no exception.

A woman sitting on a bench outdoors, spinning on a supported spindle. Another woman beside her is filming with her phone.
Photo session on day 4: Supported spindles

The five students formed a tight-knit group and I had the chance to give them proper individual feedback, something I value highly when I teach. Every student has their own context, way of learning and skill level and I want to be able to meet them where they are.

Five sweet souls

I always get a little nervous to start the course. By now I know my curriculum and how I can sharpen my teaching. What I don’t know is who the students are, how they learn and how they work as a group. Usually everything turns out wonderfully, but there is alway that tension before we have settled in the classroom an in the group. We had a lovely mix of people this year – an archaeologist, a teacher, a pharmacist, a librarian and a musician. They all brought their experience, their curiosity and their warmth to class and turned the week into such a sweet time.

I always learn heaps when I teach, but this time I learned a little extra. One of the students was from Germany and I got to practice my spinning vocabulary in German. A little wonky at first, but it was nice to give the student some rest from taking in everything in Swedish. I also learned a lot about adapting my teaching and my classroom to individual circumstances. Everyone doesn’t learn the same way and everyone doesn’t have the same conditions in the classroom. I am grateful for being reminded of that. They might need adaptations in light, sound or in what tools they can use, or just take a nap to recharge. This is all good and I get to cooperate with them to create the best context for them to learn and explore from where they are.

Book progress

The chapter is almost finished and after that I have only five more to write. Dan and I are renting a cabin right between the two biggest lakes in Sweden and we will spend a lot of the time taking photos for the book. It suddenly feels so real. I have seen the book in my mind for so long, with pictures taken here in the vast landscape, and now we are here. Smack in the middle of the real thing it all feels strangely unreal. But oh, so good.

A huge thank you to C, K, J, G and U! And to Björn Peck for providing spindles for the course and for the students to buy.

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Substack: The queen of Haberdashia

Do you have a wise woman in your heart? Tell me about her if you do! If not, you are welcome to borrow mine. On Substack you can read (and hear me read) the enchanting story of the Queen of Haberdashia.

You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Substack: I want to believe

Today I offer you another essay-style text on Substack: I want to believe. It was sparked by a conversation I had with a student a few years ago at a spinning course, and led me deep into the forest.

For the past seven weeks I have taken a writing course for Beth Kempton, River of words. We started at the source of the river and week by week wrote ourselves out to the sea. I have taken several of Beth’s courses and she always delivers the juciest courses. This one has been spectacular. Through the meanderings of the course I have grown as a writer and found a writing voice outside of my comfort zone that I really like. I will keep exploring writing on my Substack and you are welcome to join me there. I will keep writing on this blog, but I will alternate between the platforms.

My book Listen to the wool is coming along fine, I finished Chapter 14 (out of 20) just this week. I’m going to Sätergläntan to teach next week and I hope to get some writing inspiration from teaching and from my students. I can’t wait!

Today’s Substack post is the final invitation from the course and I am now ready to let the words take me to the sea.

You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Pinafore dress

Last summer I did lots of flower pounding with cosmos, coreopsis and purple pincushion flowers for a pinafore dress I had planned. I sew the dress a couple of weeks ago to wear for my daughter’s graduation.

Several things came upon me for this dress to happen. First, I had somewhat of a dyeing and printing frenzy last year, with lots of fresh leaf indigo dyeing and flower pounding. Second, I found an intreaguing modular dress that I wanted to make. I put the two together and made me a pinafore dress with pounded flowers on the yoke and skirt borders.

Tataki zome: Flower pounding

To learn more about the Japanese indigo I planted last year I took lots of courses, both online and in person. The Dogwood Dyer has lots of online courses in most things indigo and natural dyeing, as well as botanical prints. She shared all her favourite cosmos types for tataki zome, or flower pounding, and I planted them.

As soon as a bud opened I was there with my snips and kidnapped the flower to my project. Pounding them onto fabric was lots of fun and I giggled like a school girl at the beautiful colours that emerged on my swatches.

Enter pinafore dress

A textile artist I follow on Instagram, Anna Sjösvärd showed a pinafore dress she had made, inspired by a tutorial from another Instagram profile. It was the simplest model, basically two aprons joined at the shoulders and tied at the back and the front. The result was a lovely dress with a snug wrapped bodice and flouncy skirt. I decided to make one for myself, and combine it with my need to pound innocent flowers onto fabric.

I cut the yoke and skirt border and pounded away all summer – cosmos flowers of all colours, orange coreopsis and rich purple pincushion flowers. To save flower material and to create some depth in the prints I pounded the flowers between the pieces. This way one piece got the back and the other got the front of the print.

Sewing

There weren’t many pieces for this dress. Two skirt pieces, one for the back and one for the front. A front and a back bodice piece, divided above the bust for the flower prints. Two bands to tie the back apron to the front and finally a handwoven band for the tie of the front apron at the back.

Since I had cut and zigzaged the pieces during the summer, all that was left when I came back to the dress this spring was the montage of the pieces. I did the joining seams on my 17 kilo Husqvarna 2000 from the 1960’s that I got for my 21st birthday, and the hems by hand. The skirt was just two 150 centimeter wide rectangles that I added running gathers to to fit the bodice parts.

The last thing I did was to add bust darts. The sides of the bodice flared and I couldn’t live with that. I did them daringly off the cuff. A little wonky, but quite pleasing and still better than before.

I wore the dress on my daughter’s graduation and I felt very comfortable in it. The antique linen shift comes from the Berta’s flax project and it was perfect underneath the dress. I used a clutch from Onni design as a tie-on pocket.

So, the first child all grown up, at the university and in his own apartment and the second ready to meet the post-school-system world. Now what?

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Substack: The river spirit

I have a new piece for you today on Substack: The river spirit. Here is a sneak peek:

I am the gushing flood after hibernation, stretching my limbs across the banks, taking them by force. I am the nursery of tadpoles and fry, I poke pebbles awake with sun rays, and paint a thousand mirrors on spawning trout. I take tea with the clouds on days of grey. I mutter in trickles under icy covers.

The Substack account is something I have started recently and that I use to dive deep into writing for the sake of writing, regardless of the subject. I share whatever I like to share whenever I like and with no expectations from myself other than to share to those who enjoy what I write.

I got an email from a reader the other day. She was concerned that she may have to start a substack account to be able to read and comment. There is no need for that unless you want to. There is no cost, I don’t sell anything, I just share my writing for those who want to read. If you subscribe (with or without having an account) to my substack page you will get an email with the whole text every time I post something and you don’t even have to go to the Substack page. If you want to comment you can do it on the substack page (and create an account) or just as a reply to the email.

You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Substack: I write the rain

I have a new piece for you today on Substack: I write the rain. Here is a sneak peek of it:

When I think the front has brushed by, they come – rain drops the size of marbles, determined to splash to the ground as fast and dramatically as they can, turning the surge into a boiling pot, raging unapologetically before me. Sea gulls flying just above the waves, smooth bellies brushing their sharp edges.

Welcome to my Substack! Don’t worry, I will still blog here too.

You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

2024 wool journey: At the fulling mill

For many years I have wanted to full my weaves in a fulling mill. Two years ago my wool traveling club decided to weave on the 2023 wool journey with the aim of a 2024 wool journey to a fulling mill.

The day finally came. With one of the members of the club sick in the last minute we ended up with four wool travelers and around 30 meters of woven fabric between us. Boel with one 9 meter weave and the rest of us with shorter lengths. I brought three shorter weaves with my handspun and three with commercial yarns that I bought years ago on a clearance. You can read about my fulling candidates here.

An old wooden building by a creek.
The fulling mill in Dala-Floda looks like an oil painting.

17th century industrial site

The mill is situated just outside Dala-Floda in county Dalarna in Sweden, an area with a rich textile heritage. There have been buildings marked on old maps since at least the 17th century here. In the mid-19th century the fulling mill was installed in what had been a flour mill until then. The fulling mill was in process in the spring and the fall when there is enough water in the creek to drive the mill, until 1941. Nowadays Anna-Karin opens it for courses and demonstrations.

A miniature fulling mill with water wheel and fulling beams.
The miniature fulling mill was made in 1998.

We were welcomed by Anna-Karin Jobs Arnberg, who manages the mill, just as her forefathers did a couple of centuries ago. On the top floor is a miniature of the mill, that Anna-Karin uses to show the function and demonstrate the enormous powers that are involved in the fulling process. It’s amazing what can be achieved with just water, wood and wool.

Vadmalsstamp

The Swedish word for a fulling mill is vadmalsstamp. Vadmal is a heavily fulled fabric, and stamp means something that stomps. Before and parallel with the mill, vadmal was also stomped by foot in a tub for up to a week to get the final fabric.

Wet fabric is placed in a trough underneath two massive stomping beams. The troughs are slanted backwards, so that the fabrics are slowly rotated by the stomping beams, as if browsing through a book, wool page by wool page. Anna-Karin talked passionately about letting the mill do its work, and about listening to the sound and the song of the beams. Too little fabric and the stomping beams go wood on wood onto the bottom of the trough. Around 20 meters is perfect, with the total capacity of around 60 meters in the three troughs. Everywhere we went as Anna-Karin showed us the site, she listened to the mill to make sure everything was running smoothly.

A woman squatting by an old wooden door opening.
Kristin listens to the wood.

Complete fulling takes ten hours, half fulling five and three quarters somewhere in between.

Let’s stomp!

To prepare the fabrics for fulling we soaked them overnight so that they would be evenly dampened. After Anna-Karin had showed us how to operate the mill we folded each fabric into an accordion so that they all would be easy to browse through in the troughs.

To start the stomping, one person pulls out the stopping plugs and another lifts the stomping beams. The sound was just right and we could hang out in the sun with various crafting projects for the next hour.

Every hour we check and perhaps add some water. Every second hour we stop the stomping, lift the fabrics out of the troughs and check the fulling process. The first ones were finished after five hours and the rest after another hour.

Rinsing and stretching

When we decided the fabrics were fulled enough we stopped the stomping for the last time and rinsed the fabrics in the creek. Holding the fabrics in the running stream was quite an experience.

The last thing we did before we were done was to stretch the fabrics under pressure on a round roll with a crank in one end. The stretching also squeezed out a lot of water. To avoid biasing the fabrics we rolled them the other way on rolls we had brought from home. I used a suage pipe (new and unused) and the others yoga mats.

We had all been looking forward to this so much and we had the most fantastic day. I was quite intriguing to just place the fabrics in the hands of the process and see what came out of it. I think we all agree that we will do this again.

The results

Fulled soon-to-be pillow cases woven in commercial Shetland yarn.

I was fully aware of the fact that a lot could go wrong with my weaves. The commercial yarns were old and brittle and could potentially break. The twill was an experiment that could turn out in a variety of ways. I had high hopes for the dark grey Gute weave, since I had fulled a swatch years ago. I was quite wrong about most of the weaves, though.

The weaves in commercial yarns fulled evenly and beautifully – 11 % and 19 % on width and length respectively. They will be perfect for the pillow cases I had planned for them. The Gute/Icelandic weave also fulled beautifully (5% and 22 %). It hasn’t told me what it wants to become yet. The Icelandic twill did shrink (13 % and 7 %), but in sort of a pleated way. I’m not sure what to make of it. Finally, the dark grey Gute did shrink too (11 % and 12 %), but is still very much unfulled. This puzzled me and I have no idea why it wouldn’t full when the swatch did. I will try and full it manually with warm water, soap and my waulking board.

Coming up: A video

I have my phone full of video footage, over 50 clips that I will eventually edit and publish on my YouTube channel. I can’t wait to show you this magical place!

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Substack: The fern inkwell

Today I’m at the fulling mill, but I still have a poem for you over on Substack. I call it The fern inkwell. Welcome!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Substack: I come from between

I have no blog post here today. Instead I have a whole essay on my newly started Substack account. On Substack I will share my writing first and foremost. Sometimes about spinning, sometimes in other topics, but all for the sake of letting my words flow in the direction they take me. I will still write here on the blog, but sometimes my writing mind needs to take me to another special place, and land on my Substack page.

Today I write an essay I call I come from between. Welcome!

New weekend I will be at the fulling mill with my fulling candidates and I can’t promise you a post.

Happy reading!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write weekly posts, mainly about spinning. Do subscribe!
  • I share essay-style writing on Substack. Come and have a look!
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden or to book me for a lecture.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons are an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • Read the book Knit (spin) Sweden! by Sara Wolf. I am a co-author and write in the fleece section about how I spin yarn from Swedish sheep breeds.
  • I am writing a book! In the later half of 2025 Listen to the wool: A why-to guide for mindful spinning will be available. Read more about the book here.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.