Coming up

Last week I looked back on what happened during 2020. This week I make plans and dreams for this year – teaching, writing and creating. As well as a heads up for you on what I plan to make happen I see this post as sort of a business plan for myself. Once I publish this I can’t go back, right? This is what’s coming up in 2021.

A lot of things are still uncertain when it comes to Covid. Therefore many things are uncertain for me, just as it is everywhere else in the world. But that won’t stop me from dreaming and making plans.

Writing

My plan is to keep the blog as I have so far, with a weekly post. There may be an occasional article coming up in spinning magazines too. Sara Wolf’s book Knit (spin) Sweden (where I am a co-writer) is at the printer’s as we speak but has got stuck there due to, again, Covid. I think that the first copies are being distributed to the people who have signed up for preorders, though. As soon as the printed book is in Sara’s hands the work with the translation to Swedish will begin. Yay!

I also want to explore my writing. I have always loved writing – crafting the sentences, dressing feelings and observations in well chosen words and phrases. finding a balance between lyric-like interpretations and clear, concise descriptions. Giving birth to a new piece that will make its way into the world and become a part of the readers’ lives. But I have never studied writing or taken any writing courses. This is something that I am curious about and a rabbit hole I am eager to fall into. Who knows where it may take me?

Teaching, coaching and lectures

As I told you last week quite a few courses and events got cancelled in 2020. There will be a risk of cancellations this year too. I have a coupe of weekend courses planned in April, one of which is already on my course page. As we speak I am also preparing for a zoom lecture in March.

In the spring of 2020 I taught a zoom course in weaving with rya knots for a guild and I will be teaching a course series on zoom for this guild in the beginning of the year. I’m really looking forward to this series as it is a new course that I will get the chance to explore.

Sätergläntan craft education center.
Coming up: A fleece course at Sätergläntan craft education center.

If all goes well I will teach at Sätergläntan craft education center in the end of June. The five-day course is quite similar to my online course Know your fleece. The students bring their own fleece to the course and we go through different tools to investigate and explore the fleece. I really look forward to this opportunity and hope to learn a lot.

Video coaching sessions are coming up soon.
Coming up: 1:1 video coaching sessions!

Coming up: Coaching

I am also preparing for 1:1 video coaching sessions. This is a totally new field for me and I am very excited to start this adventure. I have no public page for this yet, but if you are interested, just contact me and I will fill you in with the details. The coaching session will only take place if I think I can help you. Therefore you will need to fill in a questionnaire before any money is transferred.

Online course(s) and webinars

I do have several ideas of online courses. Some of them are more technical and others have more of a mindful focus. I hope to make at least one of them happen during 2021.

Coming up with ideas is no problem. Getting started can take a while. Once I have started things can move pretty fast and soaked in a creative flow. The finishing takes a lot longer than I think and is packed with procrastination. Once I have launched I get steam rolled by a heavy attack of imposter syndrome. But it is all part of a process I need to get through to get a course out to you.

Rya wool live webinar.
Anything can happen on a live webinar! It can be scary, but also exciting since everything else I do is so edited. Webinars are live, unedited and refreshing!

I love live streaming webinars for you. In the practical and theoretical research I do to prepare for them I learn so much, as well as from your questions. The next sheep breed for an upcoming breed study webinar is already in my mind. I hope you haven’t gone tired of Swedish sheep breeds. There are lots left to cover!

If you are interested in a zoom lecture or custom made course for your spinning group or guild you are more than welcome to contact me. And of course my online school is always available for you with both paid and free online courses.

Spinning and making

A lot of spinning, weaving and knitting projects are waiting for my attention. I always have a plan to work on the oldest first, but then an idea comes and bothers me until I give that my attention and my structure has been wrecked. A loom warped with Gute yarn is under our bed, a sock yarn is on the spinning wheel, lots of fleeces in the sofa bed and plans and dreams in my mind.

Weaving Gute wool.
I have a queue of spinning, weaving and knitting projects to learn from.

I have no concrete plans for YouTube videos, but they usually come to me in the moment or through your questions. So I have no doubt there will be more videos this year! In the mean time there are lots of older videos on my channel, feel free to check them out.

Balance

To maintain some sort of balance with a full time job, a family, a business and time to breathe I need some sort of structure and tools. I have made lots of changes in my life recently and found routines that give me a lot of energy and peace of mind. Yoga and meditation are vital parts of my morning and evening routines. My daily dip in the lake gives me a rush that stays with me for hours and I can’t wait for my next bath. In fact, I’m going there as soon as I publish this post.

I also look forward to conversations with you, I learn so much from these. Your feedback, dedication and participation makes my work possible. So thank you, stay in touch!

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Know your fleece

This is it! I have pushed the publish button. Drum rolls and fanfares – My new online course Know your fleece has officially launched! Make sure you enroll in tonight’s free webinar The Hand spinner’s advantage to get access to special course offers!

Buy the course here!

Know your fleece

After a lot of hard work and a long launch period it is finally Launch Day. I wanted to make a course in wool knowledge that takes its starting point in the characteristics of the fleece you have in front of you. A breed can have typical breed characteristics, but it is the fleece you have that you will work with and get to know.

In this course you work with a fleece that you have chosen. With the help of inspirational video material and structured assignments you will explore, analyze, empower, plan and experiment with your fleece to get to know it. You work with your fleece, at your skill level, with the tools you have access to and as extensively as you like. I provide inspiration, my experience, my perspective on wool and a structure to work within.

When you have finished the course you will feel more confident in handling raw fleece and planning the process from fleece to textile. You will know how your fleece feels, behaves and how it wants to be spun.

A glimpse of the course curriculum of the new online course Know your fleece.
A glimpse of the course curriculum of the new online course Know your fleece (the image is a screen shot from the course curriculum page).

Five sheep breeds

Through the course you will get to know five Swedish sheep breeds – Gotland sheep, Gute sheep, Klövsjö sheep, Helsinge sheep and Dalapäls sheep. Three of these breeds are presented as webinars that I have streamed during the past couple of years. You may have seen them, but for the course I have edited them and added pictures, keywords and captions. For the two remaining breeds I have made new videos where I present how I prepare, spin and use them.

In one of the sheep breed videos I present Helsinge sheep and look for the main characteristics of the fleece I got.
In one of the sheep breed videos I present Helsinge sheep and look for the main characteristics of the fleece I got (the image is a screen shot of the video).

Championships tour

I will also take you on a tour of the Swedish fleece championships of 2019 together with my spinning friend Anna Lindemark. We go through the fleeces in the championships, category by category, and look at what is unique to the breeds and to the individual fleeces.

A visit to a shepherdess

Another friend of mine is shepherdess and spinner Lena Hansjons. She has a flock of Dalapäls sheep and in one of the inspirational videos of the course I visit her while she shears her sheep and talk about the endangered Dalapäls breed.

Dalapäls sheep are also presented in one of the breed study webinars that is included in the inspirational material.

Know your fleece: Course outline

The course is organized in five themed modules which include the inspirational videos. Each module also presents an assignment you will work on with your fleece and document. When the course is over you will have produced a wool board with samples and swatches to use as a guide for when you process and spin the rest of the fleece.

When you sign up for the course you will get

  • over 5 hours of video material
    • presentations of five Swedish sheep breeds
    • a tour of the Swedish fleece championships
    • a visit to a shepherdess
  • a pdf ebook of the course
  • checklists for each assignment
  • a list of the tools I use
  • useful links to further reading.

The videos (except the visit to the shepherdess) are in English. All the videos are fully captioned in English.

Requirements and material

To take this course you need to be comfortable spinning yarn and you need basic knowledge of wool preparation. When it comes to material you need

  • a washed fleece*
  • tools for wool processing
  • knitting needles
  • notepad
  • time.

*it is up to you if you want to work with washed or unwashed fleece, but I don’t provide washing instructions in the course

This is not a course in spinning or wool preparation, it is about wool knowledge and with your fleece as a case study. You work with your fleece, at your level and with the tools you have. The work and time you invest in exploring your fleece now will bring you closer to the essence of your fleece and to making it shine.

Should I buy the course?

Buying a course is an investment. Many students of my free five-day challenge Fleece through the senses have expressed a feeling of transformation in how they look at fleece after having taken on the challenge. I hope this course will do the same for you if you buy it.

I have tried to describe the course as extensively as possible. To help you decide I have made several things available for you:

  • The course page provides information about the course. You can also see the themes and headers of the lectures in the course.
  • The course promo is available on the course page. In the promo I show you glimpses of the video material and talk about the content, purpose and goal of the course.
  • The introductory video of the course is available as a preview before you buy the course.
The introductory video of the course Know your fleece is available as a free preview.
The introductory video of the course Know your fleece is available as a free preview (the image is a screenshot of the video).

Webinar: The hand spinner’s advantage

(the webinar has already taken place)

Another way to help you decide about buying the course or not is tonight’s webinar The Hand spinner’s advantage. I will stream it live today Saturday, September 19th at 5 pm CET (world clock here). In the webinar I will talk about

  • what a fleece can teach us
  • how we as hand spinners can make the superpowers of a fleece shine
  • a mindful approach to working with fleece.

In the webinar I will also talk about the online course Know your fleece. Towards the end of the webinar I have made special course offers for you that you don’t want to miss. The offers are time-limited.

Two yarns in ten different colours. As a hand spinner I have the advantage to make the most of the fleece I work with
Two yarns in ten different colours. As a hand spinner I have the advantage to make the most of the fleece I work with. I will talk about this in the webinar The Hand spinner’s advantage.

The webinar has already taken place

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

New online course and webinar

Last week I told you I would have a big announcement this week, and I do: This Saturday, September 19th I will launch my new online course Know your fleece. It is a course in wool knowledge that is presented in five themed modules. The same day I will host a free live webinar where I talk about the handspinner’s advantage. In the webinar will also talk about the online course and give you a special offer.

Preview of the course promo for the online course Know your fleece. Enrollment opens on September 19th.

Close to 300 of you have taken the five-day challenge Fleece through the senses that I launched two weeks ago (the challenge is evergreen and open for enrollment). Last week I wrote about how participants in the challenge have appreciated the mindful approach to wool that is presented in the challenge. In addition to that, a lot of the students who accepted the challenge say they have gained a new way to look at fleece after the challenge.

The hand spinner’s advantage

As hand spinners we have the opportunity to look for the essence of a fleece and make the most of it. We can choose to divide the fleece on the basis of colour, fiber type or staple type or make one yarn quality from the whole fleece. We can investigate and find the superpowers of the fleece and make it shine.

We have an advantage, a privilege and an opportunity to get to know the fleece. By exploring a fleece we can make choices for preparation and spinning that are based on our knowledge and experience as spinners.

To me, this is a happy place. I want to be with my hands and my mind in the fleece and discover its hidden treasures. The joy of finding the soul, the essence of a fleece is what drives me to create this course. To me, working with a fleece gives me as much joy and peace of mind as spinning. It is not just something I go through to get to the spinning part. The degree to which I get to know the fleece determines how well I can portray it in a way that makes it justice. The sheep has given me the fleece and I want to make it shine. This perspective is what I want to share with you.

New online course: Know your fleece

Know your fleece, a new online course. Enrollment opens on September 19th.
Know your fleece, a new online course. Enrollment opens on September 19th.

In the course Know your fleece you will join me on my journey from fleece to yarn with the help of five Swedish sheep breeds –Gotland sheep, Gute sheep, Klövsjö sheep, Helsinge sheep and Dalapäls sheep. I invite you to investigate a fleece of your choice through five assignments. This means a lot of work for you but at the same time lots of opportunities to learn more and get a deeper understanding of working with fleece in general and your fleece in particular. I invite you to explore, investigate and be curious about the fleece you have in front of you. There is no right or wrong in this. Your fleece is unique, just as your skill level and the wool preparation and spinning tools you have available.

The purpose of this course is for you to feel more confident in handling raw fleece and planning the process from fleece to textile. The goal is to produce a wool board to use as a guide for preparing and spinning your chosen fleece.

The course is organized in five themed modules with assignments where you work with your fleece and document your findings. After the course you will be able to use your wool board as a guide when you process the rest of the fleece. The work and time you invest in exploring the fleece now will bring you closer to the essence of your fleece and to making it shine.

Requirements

To take the course you need to feel comfortable in spinning yarn and you need basic knowledge in wool preparation. This is not a spinning course and not a course in wool preparation. It is a course in wool knowledge.

Material

You need:

  • a washed* fleece to work with during the course
  • Tools for wool processing – hand cards, combs, flick cards etc. You don’t need all of the tools and not from the start. Perhaps you can borrow some from a spinning friend or from a nearby guild or buy along the way.
  • Knitting needles
  • An area to work by where you have room for your fleece.
  • Time! Invest time in this course to work with your fleece.

*You can by all means choose to work with an unwashed fleece. However, the course doesn’t cover fleece washing.

What you will get

When you enroll in the course you will get

  • videos with five Swedish sheep breeds
  • a video tour of the Swedish fleece championships
  • a video where I visit a shepherdess
  • five assignments
  • an ebook version of the course
  • downloadable assignment checklists
  • useful links to further reading.

The total playing time of the videos is over 5 hours. The videos are fully captioned in English.

Launch webinar

Two yarn types in ten colours from one single fleece. The hand spinner has the advantage to find the superpowers in a fleece and make it shine. Register for The hand spinner’s advantage – a live webinar about what a fleece can teach us.

(the webinar has already taken place)

The course launches on September 19th, which also happens to be World wide spin in public Day! To celebrate the launch and the special day I will host a live webinar for you! The theme is The hand spinner’s advantage. In the webinar I will talk about

  • what a fleece can teach us
  • how we as hand spinners can make the superpowers of a fleece shine
  • a mindful approach to working with fleece.

I will also talk about the online course Know your fleece. There will be a special course offer in the webinar. The offer is time-limited and you might want to stick around until the end of the webinar to get access to the offer. But regardless of whether you buy the course or not I hope you will enjoy the theme of the webinar!

The webinar streams live on September 19th at 5 pm CET.

The webinar has already taken place

So, to sum up– here are ways to help you decide whether you want to buy the course or not:

I hope to see you on the webinar!

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram. I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Challenge accepted

Last week I launched a free five-day challenge I call the Fleece through the senses challenge. Every day for five days the students get a text lesson where I reflect over an aspect of working with fleece, some examples and a task to fulfill with their own fleece as a case study. The lesson and the task takes around 15–30 minutes a day to finish. In the challenge I inspire the students to take notes of what they find when doing the tasks.

Challenge accepted

Over 200 people have enrolled in the challenge and I get new students every day. This is mind-blowing in itself – I am so thrilled that so many people are taking this opportunity to spend time with their fleeces. But in this case there was something more going on than an accepted challenge.

Comments

What I wasn’t prepared for was the response in the comments. So many students have shared their thoughts and experiences with the rest of the class. They read and get inspired by each other’s comments and I learn so much about what people are struggling with and what background they have with fleece. The classroom is packed with knowledge and experience!

It seems like students have been inspired by the previous comments to write more than they thought they would. My impression is that many students have taken the tasks seriously and spent time and energy to do the tasks thoroughly and mindfully.

A Swedish Åsen fleece, ready to be explored.
A Swedish Åsen fleece, ready to be explored.

The teacher in the classroom

When I teach in-person classes I love being the teacher. Discovering each student’s learning style and watching them develop and blossom fuels my teacher’s engine. As a course creator, though, I spend a lot of time creating the course, but once I launch it the students are to a large extent alone in the classroom. However, from the comments in this challenge I have been able to take part of the students’ individual journeys through the challenge. I get to be with them as they discover their fleeces and I get to be the teacher in the classroom! So thank you for letting me in!

Confidence to start

Many students in the challenge say that they haven’t felt they have had the confidence to start working with a fleece. This is something I have seen on a larger scale too. Some say that a fleece has felt overwhelming. Others say they have spun from fleece but have seen the pre-spinning part as something they want to skip to get to the spinning part.

I think that this feeling is quite common, especially if you have learned to spin with commercially prepared fiber. But spinning from fleece is a wonderful way to get to know the fiber, regardless of your spinning skill level. When I started spinning eight years ago I didn’t know anything about spinning. I certainly didn’t know a thing like commercially prepared fiber even existed. I got a box of newly shorn wool in my lap, a spindle and a pair of hand cards. Now, getting to know the fleece is to me an integral part of spinning that I love just as much as shaping the fibers into yarn. I can’t have one without the other.

During my spinning career I have made lots of mistakes. But I wouldn’t have learned if I hadn’t made those mistakes. Doing something that looks good tells me that it looks good. But by making a mistake I can learn why the mistake happened and how I can avoid it in the future. I have said it before and I say it again: Your mistakes are a map of what you have learned.

Sweet Rya lamb's locks waiting to be discovered.
Sweet Rya lamb’s locks waiting to be discovered.

Respect your learning process

It is easy to get frustrated by a perceived lack of knowledge. But there is knowledge! All the students in the challenge are spinners at some level. They know how to spin and how to work with the wool. Working with fleece is an opportunity to get to know the wool from the very start. And when you do take the time to get to know it, it will teach you how it wants to be spun. Or, as a student wrote, “To jump in where you are and begin learning Is the best place to start.  This means right now today”.

Teaching intermediate students means dealing with the frustration many students can express when they think they should know one aspect of a field just because they are experienced in another. But I think it is important to respect your own learning process – you can’t know all about a field from the start. You can build on what you know but you can’t take your knowledge for granted over the whole field.

Read your mind

Many of the students in the challenge have been fascinated by what they read when they take notes of what they discover in their fleeces. This happens to me every time I write a blog post. By making notes of my thoughts I need to articulate them. The thoughts become more clear in writing and when I read what I have written I make more realizations. This seems to have been the case for the students too. They have been very clear in their descriptions of how they experience their fleece and by that they have been able to make conclusions or explore further aspects.

Shades from white to dark grey and staples from crimpy to wavy in one single Värmland fleece.
Shades from white to dark grey and staples from crimpy to wavy in one single Värmland fleece.

Transformation

During the course of the five-day challenge many students seem fascinated by the transformation of the fleece from a mass of locks to something that can actually teach them something. By listening to the wool they discover the potential in the fleece and learn to understand it.

In this there also seems to be something of a personal transformation. A lot of the students say they have a new way of looking at fleece after the challenge. They see the potential of the fleece. Or, rather the potential of a potential that they will discover if they take the time to explore it. This new perspective will have a significant influence on how they look at fleece in the future. Students say they will continue to take the time to listen to and get to know the fleece and let it lead the way.

I hold this transformation particularly close to my heart. The seed to this course is the love of fleece and what it can teach us. If the challenge has helped only one person to this transformation I am over the moon.

Elin the Gestrike fleece is full of potential.
Elin the Gestrike fleece is full of potential.

Confidence to continue

While many students have expressed a lack of confidence to take on a fleece in the first lesson of the challenge, they also say they have a new confidence in the fifth and final lesson. I feel they have gained a new respect for themselves as learning beings. With open minds they show a curiousity about what their fleeces can tell them. They know that every new fleece is a journey of learning that they now are more than happy to make. And that truly warms my woolly heart.

My friend Sara wrote a blog post about her participation in the challenge together with her Gute lamb Elvis. You can read the post here.

Are you tempted to join the challenge? Find a fleece and come to the Fleece through the senses classroom!

This it what you will see when you come to the course page of the five-day challenge Fleece through the senses. This is a screenshot.

Next week I plan to make a big announcement!

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Five-day challenge

Listen to the wool. It has a lot to teach us.

Lately I have been working a lot with course creation. I have a number of things in the pipeline, but first up is a free five-day challenge! I call it the Fleece through the senses challenge.

The challenge of a fleece

I love working with fleece. It gives me the opportunity to discover its characteristics layer by layer. From the questions people ask me I get the sense that many spinners are afraid of doing things the wrong way when it comes to working from a raw fleece. My usual answer to questions about how to do this or that is to try, compare and see what happens. Experiment and analyze, let your hands explore and see what information they can get from listening to the wool.

I know that there is so much to learn from really digging deep into a fleece. Every time I meet a new fleece I learn something new that helps me understand how wool works in general and the fleece that I work with in particular. I want to share the joy of working from raw fleece all the way to a spun yarn. At the same time, I realize that the thought of approaching a fleece can seem a bit daunting if you haven’t done it before. To offer some support and structure I have created this five-day challenge where you work with your own fleece (or part of a fleece) as a case study.

Listen to the wool. It has a lot to teach us.
Listen to the wool. It has a lot to teach us.

Fleece through the senses

I call the challenge the Fleece through the senses challenge. I do believe in experiencing a fleece through looking, feeling and especially listening to the wool and all it can tell me if I just let it. This challenge is intended for both spinners who are curious about working with a fleece and spinners who do work with fleece and want to try a new approach.

Five-day challenge

In the challenge you will get five text lessons over five days. Each lessons has a theme where I write about an aspect of working with a fleece through the senses. In each lesson you will also get a task to work with. My recommendation is that you work 15–30 minutes with the task, but nothing stops you from working longer than that of course.

The course page of the Fleece through the senses challenge.
This is what you will see when you get to the course page (this is a screen shot).

Each day of the challenge the lesson will be available at the challenge page at midnight UTC. If you enroll in the challenge after that you will get access to the lesson the next day. 15 hours after the lesson has become available to you you will get an email about it.

You need a fleece or part of a fleece (washed or unwashed) to go through the challenge and around 15–30 minutes a day to work with it. You also need pen and paper to take notes of your findings.

The purpose of the challenge is for you to learn more about the knowledge you can get access to if you give yourself time to discover a fleece with your senses. The goal is to peel the layers of a fleece of your own and write down what you have found. My hope is that after you have finished the challenge you will get a sense of what working with a fleece can be like or, even better, you want to continue approaching fleece the way I have come to love.

Enroll in the five-day challenge here!

Happy spinning!


You can find me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • I support Centro de textiles tradicionales del Cusco, a group of talented textile artists in Cusco, Peru who dedicate their work to the empowerment of weavers through the revitalization and sustainable practice of Peruvian ancestral textiles in the Cusco region. Please consider supporting their work by donating to their causes.

Being a creator

Five skeins of handspun yarn from natural white through medium greys to dark grey. Three of the shades have specks of colour in them.

I love being a creator – blogging, making videos, webinaring (It is a word as of kindanowish), teaching and working with wool. The response I get from you truly warms my heart. I love that I learn so much from doing what I do and from interacting with you. I can’t imagine not doing it and not developing this work. However, it takes a lot of time, energy and money to keep my work going.

This is not a post about spinning. It is about showing you what lies behind the posts, videos, webinars and courses I make and the time it takes. It is also an invitation for you to contribute to the work I do.

The joy and hard work of being a creator

Josefin Waltin spinner is a whole bundle of services for spinners. You can read in-depth blog posts, watch spinning videos, join a webinar or take an online course. If you happen to be in Sweden you can also take face-to-face courses. Hopefully there is something for everyone. While this is something that I love doing it is not done without hard work.

Blog

My fingers itch to write. I have a physical need to write, to shape my thoughts with words. Writing helps me think and deepen my understanding of the subject. Since I know I have many readers I try to be as thorough as possible and do a lot of research, testing and sampling to prepare for a post. I learn a lot from this research process too.

While I do shape and fine tune the post during the whole week, Saturday is the day I make the final adjustments and publish the post. I get up at 7 am to get some time all to myself to finish and publish the post for you.

Average preparation time per post: 3–4 hours.

Videos

I started making videos to share my love for the craft. It still works. When I make a video I explore a technique or process to learn. I also make the video to spread knowledge and encourage you to explore and learn. It is like we are on a quest for new or deeper knowledge together. Finding new angles and ways to tell the story of a particular technique or aspect of spinning drives me to continue exploring spinning through this fascinating media.

A screen shot of a video editing process
Being a creator also requires learning the tech

It starts with an idea – a technique or tool I am curious about or have got questions from you about. I shoot the video. It can take anything from an hour to a day, depending on how much I need to prepare for the shoot. Sometimes I want to shoot a whole process and then I need to do the whole process even if I only show you glimpses of it in the video. Two examples of this is Slow fashion – from sheep to sweater and Slow fashion 2 – from sheep to shawl. After shooting the video I edit, create effects, add titles and music. If I speak in the video I also add captions. It is a subtle balance between being creator and learning and understanding tech and software.

Average preparation time for a 3 minute video: 5 hours.

Webinars

Webinars is my best way to stay connected to you. I’m live and unedited and anything can happen. But to be able to talk to you there and then gives me so much.

There seems to be a high demand on this type of service. I haven’t come across anyone in this field that does webinars and I think it is a very powerful medium that works very well with spinning and wool.

Josefin Waltin drafting wool from a comb
A webinar is a perfect medium for hand spinning

When I prepare a webinar I first make an outline and write a script. Perhaps I need to prepare fiber or spin yarn for the webinar to be able to show you a special technique. I make a promo video, set up registration, send emails and prepare the studio. I rehearse at least three times before the live event.

The studio isn’t ideal, but it’s the best I can manage at the moment. I host the webinars in our tiny study. For the best lighting possible I move all the lamps I can to the room and use a king size bed sheet as a backdrop. I am afraid to move, the room is full of cables, lamps and working material come Webinar Day.

Better lighting solutions for the webinars are a priority as well as the possibility of changing camera angles or zooming.

Average preparation time for a one hour webinar: 5 hours.

Online courses

Many of you have taken my free course How to pick a supported spindle and bowl and some of you have also taken my paid course Spin on a supported spindle or the ebook version of Spin on a supported spindle. I love making these courses and keep exploring the possibilities that an online course can give. I am happy for all the feedback I get from you, it helps me become a better course creator and teacher.

A person spinning on a supported spindle
From the online course Spin on a supported spindle

Making an online course takes a lot of time. I make an outline, write the script and create extra material like pdfs, check lists, glossaries etc. After that I shoot the A-roll (the main angle with me as a talking torso) and the B-roll (closer images to show you details of a technique). I edit, add titles, images and cut the material into lecture-size pieces. I usually make a written pdf version of the whole course. The final part is captioning the whole course. This takes a lot of time since I need to transcribe everything I say and place the text chunks in the right spot with a decent duration. An estimation is that captioning takes me around 10 minutes for every video minute.

Even though the captioning takes a lot of time and energy I will not skip this part. So many people benefit from captioning. Several students who don’t consider themselves sufficient in English have told me that they wouldn’t have been able to take my courses without the written pdfs and the captions. I have not yet found a way to create optional captioning, so for the time being I burn them in and I ask those of you who are annoyed about them to be patient.

Average working time for an online course: Several weeks or months.

Patreon

To those of you who are patrons already: Thank you, from the bottom of my heart. For believing in me enough to make monthly pledges for my creative work. For those who are not patrons: Thank you for believing in me, asking questions, giving me valuable feedback and spreading my work. It warms my heart and keeps me going.

Being a creator makes my heart sing but at the same time it is hard work.Patreon is an online membership platform that allows fans to regularly provide financial support to creators. It also enables fans to get to know the creators better and get access to exclusive material. Here is a video that explains how Patreon works.

I have made four different reward tiers my patrons can choose from. The gist of it is that the more you are able to contribute monthly the better rewards I can offer you for $1, 2, 3 or 5 a month. There is also a fifth option to choose a donation amount of your choice and without rewards.

I say it again: I love doing this work for you and I can’t imagine not doing it. But it does take a lot of my time and energy on top of a family life and a full time job. I would like to be able to spend more time with my family whilst making better content for you. If I could cut back on my day job, I would have a more balanced life and get food on the table. Concrete things I would like to get to make better quality content for you are things like software for different services that makes the job easier, equipment for better audio, video and lighting and captioning services.

The material that is free today will continue to be free – blog posts, videos, the free online courses and live webinars. But with your contributions I can keep creating for you and still live a balanced life. If you like what I do and want me to be able to continue my work sustainably, consider becoming a patron.

Thank you.

Happy spinning!

Josefin Waltin sitting with a pile of wool. Locks are flying in the air around her.

You can follow me in several social media

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Ebook

In the beginning o March I launched my new online course Spin on a supported spindle. Today I release the ebook that is based on the course.

Many spinners have joined the (video based) course Spin on a supported spindle in my online spinning school and those who have finished it are spinning happily on their supported spindles. You can read more about the video course here.

Same information, different media

I can’t promise you that you will learn how to spin on a supported spindle from the ebook alone. However, if you are curious about the supported spindle but you are not sure whether it is something for you, this is your chance. In the 28 page ebook you get the same information as in the online course, but in text and images only. The ebook is sort of a polished transcript of the audio from the video course, together with images. There is no audio and no video in the ebook.

I have included a glossary and a list of spindle makers in the ebook version of the course.

The price of the ebook is $20.

Who is the ebook for?

The ebook will probably not be enough to learn how to spin on a supported spindle if you haven’t tried it before. But there are still many good reasons to buy the ebook:

  • If you are unsure of whether the online course is for you, you can buy the ebook and see if you like it. If you do like it you can buy the online course too.
  • You may have learned the first steps in supported spindle spinning but you feel stuck. If you feel you need some pointers of how to move on to the next level the ebook may be a good start.
  • If you think the online course is over your budget, the ebook is a good option. You will miss out on all the video and audio, but the ebook is still a start.
  • If you don’t have time to take the video course just yet you can buy the ebook to prepare for the video course.
  • If you have purchased the (video) online course on the basic plan and you want a text version you can buy the ebook. You will end up at the same price level as the bonus plan of the video course, which already includes the ebook. The bonus plan also includes two extra videos. If you are on the basic plan and buy the ebook, I will give you the bonus videos for free.
  • Those of you who have purchased the online course on the bonus or VIP level already have access to the ebook.

If you are one of the spinners in the bullet list, go ahead and buy the ebook Spin on a supported spindle. And welcome to school!

Happy spinning!


You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Course launch Day!

Today is Course Launch Day! The cart is now open and you can enroll in the Course Spin on a supported spindle! Pick your pricing tier and enroll now! The prices are limited to the first five days. After Wednesday I will raise the prices. So for a lower price, the time to enroll is now.

Pricing plans for the online course Spin on a supported spindle
The pricing plans (no link, you need to go to the course page to enroll)

This is how you do it:

  1. Click this link to get to the course page.
  2. Click on the big red enroll button
  3. Choose your pricing plan.
  4. Enter your payment information and you are on your way!

Make sure to check your spam filter for lost emails!

In every part of the course you have the opportunity to ask me questions in the comments section. I’ll try to answer as quickly as possible.

For more information about the course, look in last week’s blog post.

A big thank you to everyone who has supported me on my blogYouTube channelInstagramFacebook and Patreon. You help me become a better spinner, teacher and course creator.

I’ll see you in the course!

Happy spinning.

Josefin

P.S. Don’t forget the live webinar tonight at 5 pm CET (world clock here)!

motionmailapp.com

You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

A new online course

A new online course: Spin on a supported spindle

I have been hinting about a new online course for a while and now it is finally happening! This Saturday, March 2nd, I will launch the online course Spin on a supported spindle – a comprehensive step-by-step guide to spinning on a supported spindle with confidence. Read about the course here and register for the live webinar!

Spinning on a supported spindle, a new online course

Spinning on a supported spindle is something that lies very close to my heart. Supported spindle spinning may be my most favorite spinning technique and also the technique I have been teaching for the last 2,5 years. Through my classes I have seen the most common mistakes and beginner’s struggles. In the online course I try to address these issues to give you as many tools as possible to learn how to spin continuously and effortlessly.

The superpowers of supported spindle spinning

This technique has so many superpowers and I will go through each one in the course. With supported spindle spinning you can

  • spin in different places than other spinning techniques
  • experiment
  • spin in crowded places
  • focus on quality
  • spin very short fibers
  • find inner balance
  • spin faster than with other spindle techniques
  • produce a yarn that is extremely thin
  • spin with more ease and less strain than many other techniques

Meditative

One of the most compelling traits of supported spindle spinning is that it is meditative. That is true for many spinning techniques, but there is something extra special about the rhythm of supported spindle spinning. If I feel stressed I often take a supported spindle and spin for a while. It lets my brain rest and find balance.

Spinning on a supported spindle is truly meditative
Spinning on a supported spindle is truly meditative

Quality

Another one of the most powerful features of supported spindle spinning is that you can focus on the quality in a way that no other spinning technique allows. With supported spindle spinning you have a 100 % control over drafting and tension. Your hands control both fiber and yarn and at a distance from your eyes that allows you to carefully watch and feel what is happening in the drafting zone. This means that you are able to study the behaviour of the wool closely achieve the result you want right there, between your hands.

Less strain

Many people say that supported spindle spinning puts less strain on arms and shoulders than other types of spinning. When you spin on a supported spindle you move your arms minimally. That means that arms and shoulders can rest in the motion and your fingers will do the work with the help of low friction against a smooth bowl surface.

I had one student who had constant pains after a car accident. Some spinning techniques were difficult for her to do for longer periods of time due to the pain. But after the course she said that she could spin on a supported spindle for hours. It really warmed my heart to hear and I was truly happy for her.

Course design

In the course I will walk you through supported spindle spinning step by step. Everything in the course is video-based so that you can see what I do. There are 4 sections and 11 theoretical and practical lessons. All the lessons are captioned and there are informative titles for important keywords and concepts. I have also included a glossary pdf so the you can look up important terms during the course.

Course outline

In the course we will look at

  • Getting to know your spindle: We get acquainted with the spindle and look at why we spin on a supported spindle
  • Yarn exercises: With step-by-step exercises with yarn we isolate the movements and learn movements, hand positions and yarn angles without having to manage fiber and drafting at the same time. We also look at spindle anatomy and differences in models and design.
  • Managing fiber and technique: We spin with fiber and practice park and draft at our own pace. We also dive a bit deeper in technique.
  • Spinning continuously: We let go of the last preparational exercises and learn how to spin continuously.
outline of the course Spin on a supported spindle
The outline of the course

Material requirements

To be able to take the course you need just a few things:

  • A supported spindle. If you don’t have one you can take my free course How to pick a supported spindle and bowl to find out which model that will work best for you.
  • A spindle bowl. This could be a special spinning bowl or a household bowl with a smooth surface.
  • A piece of yarn for the yarn exercises.
  • Fiber to spin with. Pick a fiber that you are comfortable with.

Who can take the course?

To make the most of this course you will need to know how to spin on a suspended (drop) spindle and be comfortable with spinning on a suspended spindle. You need to know how wool and fiber behave and how a spindle behaves. You can still take the course if you don’t know this. However, I think you will get the most out of the course if you do know how to spin on a suspended spindle and that you are comfortable with spinning on a suspended spindle.


When you have finished the course you will know

  • why we spin on a supported spindle
  • the basic movements and techniques of spinning with a supported spindle 
  • why we do what we do in supported spindle spinning

With practice you will learn how to spin continuously with a supported spindle.

The course will be available in my online school this Saturday March the 2nd.

Live webinar: Spindle ergonomics

This Saturday, March 2nd at 5 pm CET, I will host a live webinar. I will talk about spindle ergonomics and how we can adjust our spinning to avoid pain and strain. I will also talk about the online course.

This is a chance for me to meet you (in the chat at least, I won’t be able to see you) and for you to see me live and unedited. I am terrified about this but also very excited. And I know you will be kind webinar participants and not eat me alive.

The webinar has already taken place

Happy spinning!

You can follow me on several social media:


  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Online course

I have no spinning video for you today. Instead I have

my very first online course!

I can finally come closer to you all and be a part of your spinning process.

Free course!

The first online course I offer is a course in how to pick a supported spindle and bowl. Here is a link to the course,

How to pick a supported spindle and bowl – a quick guide to finding your best supported spindle and bowl in three steps

This course is free and always will be. I have taught lots of in-person classes in supported spindle spinning and I know it is difficult to find a supported spindle that is right for an individual spinner’s personal spinning preferences and context. Want to see the promo?

How to pick a supported spindle and bowl

So, I chose to make the free course about picking a supported spindle and bowl. Many students have come to me with their own supported spindles and many times these haven’t been very good spinning tools. But how are they supposed to know a good supported spindle from a not-so-good one? In the course I have put together my experience as a teacher of supported spindle spinning to help you find your best supported spindle and bowl. This is also a good course even if you are an experienced supported spindle spinner. Take the course and see if your spindle(s) and bowl(s) are the best for you.

In the course I will take you through the process of finding your best supported spindle and bowl in three steps:

  • What to look for in a supported spindle and bowl – important features for good spinning quality and considerations based on your own spinning context
  • Where to find supported spindles and bowls – on- or offline
  • How to make a decision – which one to buy once you have found a few you like.

A spindle and bowl
How to find your best supported spindle and bowl!

The course creation process

There are lots of things to think about when creating an online course. I have made several mistakes along the way and learned a lot from them.

I have the curriculum from my in-person courses, but not everything is translatable to an online setting. With online students I can’t do any hands-on guidance or live interaction, but I can use the medium to my advantage with slow motion clips, close-ups, guiding titles and lots of editing.

I chose to make as much of the content both auditive, visual and text-based to accommodate as many learning processes as possible. Obviously I talk through the course and show your what I do, but I have also added key words in text. There is a pdf version of the course if you like that better.

Captions

The most time-consuming part of the video-making is the captioning. You can pay someone else to do the captions for you, but I can’t afford that yet (but it will definitely be the first thing I’ll outsource when I can). First I need to transcribe everything I say, which takes a lot of time and focus. Then I obsess over seeing my colloquial language in writing – it looks horrible. After that I need to create all the caption segments, add the captions and match them to the timeline. Lots of fidgeting with milliseconds, but it is all worth it. English is not my first language, just as it is not for many of my followers, so I think it will make the course more inclusive. And I really like the result!

I had some trouble making the captions closed (so that the viewer can choose whether to have the captions on or off), so to spare myself some grief, I finally decided to burn them in. If there is a demand for closed captions, I’ll see what I can do for future courses.

The setting

The course was shot in my childhood home, where my parents still live. The kitchen bench I’m sitting on used to be my mother’s bed when she was a child. My parents were out of town when I shot the video, so I borrowed their dining room and made some interior decorating adjustments. The room has lots of windows in three directions, so there was a beautiful flow of daylight in the room. Also, there was no annoying airplane noise (which there is at our home). I really like this setting and I hope I can borrow it again on another online course shooting day.

Josefin Waltin sitting oh a kitchen bench with spindles in her hands.
Video, audio, key words and captions to match as many learning styles as possible.

Spread the word

So go ahead and take the course! Even if you are not planning on buying any supported spindles for a while – it gives you a chance to see what my courses are like. And if you know someone that might be interested in the course, spread the word. Since my work from now on most likely will be considered self promotion I doubt that I can link to my channels on Facebook forums with rules against “soft sell”.  Subscribe to this blog, my YouTube channel, facebook page and Instagram and share these channels to make sure you or your spinning friends don’t miss anything.

Enroll in the course and let me know what you think!

Josefin Waltin sitting on a kitchen bench.
Come and enroll in the course!

Happy spinning!


You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!