Learning by teaching

Two persons spinning on supported spindles.

At the moment I am teaching a course series in supported spindle spinning. I get so proud when I see the progress my students are making – from the initial wobbliness, through understanding what is going to happen to actually managing to control the spindle and in a relaxed motion. It is a journey I have the privilege of being a part of and I feel so lucky to be able to be learning by teaching and seeing their development first hand.

If you are curious about my spinning courses, have a look at my course page where I have both online courses and face-to-face courses (in Sweden).

A table with spindles, spindle bowls and wool processing tools.
All is set for spinning class. I want the students to feel like they are in a candy store for spinners. The spindles and bowls in the front are made by Björn Peck.

Learning by teaching

The thing is, I learn as much as they do. I learn about different learning styles, how to get a message through and how to live up to the students’ expectations. Most of all I learn through the communication with my students.

Learning styles

Every time I interact with a student I need to understand how this individual learns things best. This is a bit difficult in shorter courses, but when I teach the same people for a longer time, like I am in the current course, I get the chance to really understand how to structure my content in a way that makes the most sense to each and every one of them.

Their progress is my reward. When I see improvement from start to present I know that the message has gone through and that I have been able to coach them into finding a way that works for them.

Two persons spinning on supported spindles.
Students making progress!

For every wobbling spindle, uneven rolag or breaking yarn I see I try to understand where the missing link is and how this particular student can understand why something is happening and how they can get past the problem.

Teaching spinning direction

I teach about spinning direction. I make my students learn how to spin with both hands as spindle hand and fiber hand. If you have followed my blog for a while you know I am an advocate of pulling the spindle towards the hand rather than pushing it (if you haven’t, you can read this post about spinning direction and ergonomics or watch this webinar). So for my students to be able to both spin and ply or spin in both directions they need to learn how to do it with both hands, pulling the spindle.

A person spinning on a supported spindle. The spindle is in the left hand and the fiber in the right. Spindles and wool processing tools in the background.
I make all my students learn how to use both hands as spindle hand and fiber hand. Their reward is a better sense of both tasks for both hands. Mine is their understanding and progress.

Not only do they learn how to flick the spindle with both hands, they also learn how to handle the fiber with both hands. Today one of the students was amazed at how much more sensitive her right hand was when handling the fiber. Epiphanies like this make my heart sing – moments when my students understand something and can make progress.

New tool for skilled spinners

Most of the spinners I teach have been spinning for a while. I never direct my courses to beginners (that takes more teaching skills than I have). Occasionally, though, new spinners take my courses. I love the level I can discuss fibers and spinning techniques with my students. It is so rewarding to talk spinning with people who are really good at it. They know how to spin, just not with this particular tool.

However, being a beginner in a field you are normally skilled in can be very frustrating. I need to remind my students to be kind to themselves. Sometimes I need to tell them not to expect to succeed after having tried a new technique for a few minutes.

A person spinning on a supported spindle
This student was a very skilled suspended spindle spinner before my course and is now just as skilled at supported spindle spinning.

Sometimes they get so focused on this new technique that they forget that they know other skills like drafting and holding the fiber. We have talked about the baby bird: how to hold the fiber as if it were a baby bird – firmly enough not to let it escape and loosely enough not to crush it. To emphasize the importance of the light grip of the fiber I even asked them to name their bird. Am I being cruel?

You’ve prepared your wool now spin it

I believe in preparing your own fiber. It may take longer to prepare your fiber in the classroom and you may get less meterage spun but the reward is a deeper understanding of the fiber and how it behaves in the drafting.

Clowe-up of a person carding wool. A counter-clockwise arrow is drawn on the left hand and a clockwise arrow on the right hand.
In the spinning class we prepare our own fiber. Note the arrows on this student’s hands – counter-clockwise on the left hand and clockwise on the right for ergonomic supported spindle spinning.

I know how much fiber processing has helped me understand how fiber behaves. How could I not teach wool processing with this knowledge? It also helps the students understand the importance of wool processing when they spin. An uneven top or rolag will make a difference in the yarn.

In the beginning I taught supported spindle spinning with combed top or carded batts. Since I have started teaching carding and combing and letting the students process their own fiber in the classroom I see a deeper understanding of the processing itself and the importance of good processing for a good spinning result. All of them could show me a row of rolags with the first one uneven and loose and the last even and well defined. And they could make a clear connection between the quality of the processing, the spinning experience and the resulting yarn.

Piles of raw fleece
There’s fleece in the candy store!

Common challenges

Every time I understand the reason for a problem in the classroom I make a new deposit to my experience bank that I can use in future classes. I get to understand common problems, why they occur and how I can change my teaching to make the learning smoother. Problems will occur and to a large extent the same ones. But if I understand what is causing them and how I can coach different students in how to get past them I will become a better teacher. For every time I understand a common challenge I can add it to my curriculum to the benefit of future students in face-to-face and online courses.

Questions help me understand

Whenever a student asks a question I need to find their perspective in my reply. Knowing is one thing, explaining to someone requires you to structure and verbalize that knowledge. This helps me explain something from my own perspective – I have acquired skills from my experience and I explain and show these to my students. But when they ask questions it isn’t my perspective anymore and I need to restructure my knowledge. It is like I look at a vase on a glass table. I can describe the vase from when I stand. However, to describe the vase to someone standing on the other side of the table I may need to move or even crawl under the table to understand how they see the vase – and how they don’t see it. Even if crawling under the table may seem uncomfortable I realize that I learn so much more about the vase when I have seen it from another person’s perspective.


Thank you C, N, N and P. You and all my past and future students make me a better teacher.

Homework this week is to spin singles, both clockwise and counter-clockwise and of course with both hands.

Gotta go. Today I’m teaching how to ply on the fly.

Happy spinning!


You can follow me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

A spindle a day

A meadow of flowers with a red building in the background.
Sätergläntan craft education center in its prettiest midsummer dress.

Yesterday I came back from Sätergläntan center for craft education. I have been teaching a five-day course in different spindle techniques. I call the course A spindle a day, referring to both the outline of the course and of the way spinning keeps me healthy – it makes me feel focused, peaceful and and sharp.

A person spinning on a suspended spindle in backlight
The rooms bursts with creativity on A spindle a day. Spindle by Wildcraft.

Sätergläntan bursts of crafting and creativity and it is a very inspirational place to be. This is the second time I teach at Sätergläntan, the last time was last October when I taught a five-day course in supported spindle spinning. I feel so lucky to be able to teach here. Only a couple of weeks ago Hazel Tindall and Nancy Marchant taught classes here.

A spindle a day

In October 2018 I taught a five-day course in supported spindle spinning. The principal of the center asked me if I wanted to come back and teach this summer. I did. From previous courses I knew that many people want to learn how to spin on a supported spindle, but I also know that there are many other spindle types that people want to learn. I sketched up a new course and called it A spindle a day.

I wanted to create a course where people could learn different spindle types, but also to really enjoy the superpowers of the slowness of spindle spinning. Spindle spinning allows you to focus on quality. You get time to listen to the wool and find out how it wants to be treated to be able to spin its best yarn.

Practicing spindle techniques is also a perfect thing to do outdoors – all you need is a spindle and some processed fiber and you are good to go. After all, that’s how people have been spinning for tens of thousands of years.

Day 1: Suspended spindle

The first part of day 1 was dedicated to wool knowledge and processing. After that we were ready to spin!

Wool knowledge

We started the first day with some basic wool knowledge. We looked at some of the Swedish breeds and their characteristics – staple length, crimp, fiber types, fineness etc. Handling wool from the very beginning helps us get to know the wool and understand what the characteristics do in a yarn and how we can enhance certain characteristics in the way we prepare and spin the yarn.

Combing wool

We also needed some wool to spin with, so we spent the next lesson combing. Some had combed before but hadn’t really got the hang of it and some had not combed at all. We used mainly a very dense Swedish Leicester wool that was a challenge to separate.

A person combing wool outdoors.
Don’t rush your combing. It needs your love and attention just as much as the spinning does. Combs from Gammeldags, wool from Värmland sheep.

We also looked at desired characteristics of hand combs – Tine length, sharpness, tine rows and distance between the tines. All these aspects will have an impact of the yarn we spin. As a spinner I need to adapt my combs to the wool I use and the result I want.

Suspended spindle

Most of the students in the class had spun on a suspended spindle before, some for a long time. They took the time to focus and practice. Some of them had never set the spindle in motion by rolling the shaft up the thigh before and were amazed at the speed it induced.

A person spinning on a suspended spindle
A lot of speed is inserted in the spindle when the spinner sets it in motion by rolling the shaft up the thigh. The spindle was made by the student.

The most experienced spinner played the game “how long can I spin before I need to roll the yarn onto the shaft” and set the spindle in motion with her feet.

A person rolling a spindle between the feet to set the spindle in motion.
You don’t need a spinning wheel to use with your feet for spinning! Spindle by Forsnäs Hemman.

Beginner spindler

There was one student who had no prior spinning or wool processing experience. It was my responsibility to meet her at her level and find the right step size for her to make progress and shine. And she did! It was wonderful to see how she worked with the wool with determination and dedication, how she understood the concept of drafting and found the point of twist engagement.

A person drafting yarn from a spindle she is pinching between her knees.
A new spinner is born. With dedication and determination she approached the suspended spindle and made impressive progress. Here she is parking and drafting. Towards the end of the day she started to skip the parking part.

Changing hands

When I teach spindle spinning I encourage, no, I make my students change hands. I want them to be able to use either hand as spinning hand or fiber hand. All hands in my class need to learn and be comfortable with how to control the fiber and how to control the yarn. I am a firm believer that you understand more about the spinning process and spinning mechanics if both hands know both tasks.

All the students did as I told them and they were amazed at how it actually worked after the initial learning process.

Day 2: Floor-supported spindle

On the second day all the students were beginners again, none of them had any previous experience of the floor-supported spindle.

A spindle from above
Navajo spindle by Björn Peck

A floor-supported spindle is, obviously, supported by the floor. It is thus a long spindle, somewhat longer if you sit on a chair than if you sit on the floor. We focused on the Navajo spindle where the spinner spins longdraw from hand-carded rolags.

A spindle with white and brown bulky yarn on it.
Practicing bulky singles on a Navajo spindle. Spindle by Björn Peck.

Carding rolags

With Navajo spindle spinning there are no short cuts – you need to make hand-carded rolags and they need to be even. The quality of the rolag will have consequences for the spinning process and the yarn you are spinning.

A person carding wool
There are no shortcuts – Navajo spindle spinning requires even and consistent hand-carded rolags!

Most of the students had experience in carding, but they all realized what difference dedicated time and thoroughness can do for the result. They learned quickly, though, and were amazed at their own progress – after a few loose and uneven rolags came concentric and even ones that made the teacher very proud.

A grayish-brown skein of singles yarn.
A thick singles yarn spun from hand-carded rolags on a Navajo spindle. The wool comes from the Värmland sheep Viola.

Let your hands listen to the wool

With a Navajo floor-supported spindle your hands need to communicate. Those of you who have watched the beautiful video of Navajo weaver Clara Sherman spinning on a Navajo spindle have heard her talk about the hands knowing and feeling what to do. This is very true when it comes to Navajo spindle spinning. The spindle hand is rolling the spindle shaft up the thigh and the fiber hand is holding the rolag ever so lightly. No hand is on the yarn to control it. The yarn is created in the cooperation between the hands, like a choreographed dance. The hands therefore need to listen to the wool to know when more twist needs to be added and when to add more length to the yarn or to open up the twist.

A person spinning on a floor-rested spindle
Learning to spin on a Navajo floor-supported spindle. Spindle by Björn Peck.

Being a beginner in a known field

The students I teach are generally experienced spinners. But when they come to my classroom they are beginners again. This can cause lots of frustration. As intermediate and experienced spinners they have so much knowledge. They know how wool behaves, how to draft and what they need to do to the yarn to get it where they want. They just don’t know this particular tool. I need to remind them to be patient and have respect for their own learning process.

A person spinning outdoors on a floor-rested spindle
The weather wasn’t always spinning-friendly, but when it was we took the chance to spin outdoors. Navajo spindle by Björn Peck.

Day 3: In-hand spindle with distaff

Mid-week we are tired. The students have been stuffed for two days and their brains need time to process all the things they have learned. And that’s ok. Sometimes we need to stop and listen, take a break or a step back. Still, they managed to take in and flourish in a new spinning technique and a new way to handle the fiber.

In this section of the course we also looked at some historical aspects of spinning. How did they spin in Central European medieval times? How did the Vikings spin? We also looked at French, Portuguese and Balkan spindles, which are all spun with a similar technique and with a distaff.

Twiddling

For the in-hand (or grasped or twiddle) spindle, the spinner holds the upper tip of the spindle between their fingers and turns the spindle in the hand. After some practice you can let go of the spindle and allow it to spin freely for short periods, still in the hand, always ready to grasp again. This was a challenge to the students. They thought they would never be able to control the spindle in the hand, but before lunch they all did!

Handling in-hand spindle and distaff is not a walk in the park.

Managing the distaff

The next step was to add the distaff. That too was a challenge – to hold the distaff while at the same time draft with the fiber hand, twiddle the spindle and keep an eye on the yarn going diagonally over the chest. They managed that too.

A person walking while spinning.
We’re taking our in-hand spindles and distaffs for a walk.

In fact, we even went for a walk with our spindles and distaffs. Now, that’s progress!

Day 4: Supported spindle

A person spinning on a supported spindle from a rolag.
It’s Supported spindle spinning Day! Supported spindle and puck by Björn Peck.

This is my game. I have taught lots of classes in supported spindle spinning. I know what to do, I know my course outline and I know the most common challenges the students face.

This time I was dead wrong.

These students have, step by step and in other contexts, become acquainted with most of the skills needed for supported spindle spinning, and they didn’t need much of my assistance before they were spinning away on their supported spindles. They didn’t have to start with a leader to practice the movements and angles, they had already practiced them the previous days with the other techniques.

People spinning on different kinds of spindles
Learning supported spindle spinning after suspended, floor-rested and in-hand spindle spinning turned out to be a smooth process.

Old skills in a new package

This is the thing about new skills – even if you are totally new to a thing, you always have some older skills you can apply to the new ones, albeit in a new package.

  • They know from the floor-rested and in-hand spindles how to change the angle between spinning and rolling onto the shaft.
  • With the in-hand spindle they have practiced fine-motor skills for twiddling the spinning tip.
  • Early on the first day we talked about opening up the twist to achieve a more even yarn and they have practiced it ever since.
  • Since day one they have practiced wool preparation and know what consequences it has for the quality of the spinning and the yarn.
  • For nearly every question they have asked I have encouraged them to analyze and find the answer themselves. They have started to analyze more themselves now and understand more why things happen the way they do in their spinning.
  • They know how to pack a mean permanent cop.

All I had to do was to coach them in flicking and encourage them to analyze even more.

I’m so proud of them!

A person spinning on a supported spindle from a rolag.
Spinning on a supported spindle from high quality hand-carded rolags. Supported spindle and puck by Björn Peck.

Day 5: Wool tasting

The fifth day was only half a day, so there was no new spindle. Instead the students put their new skills to the test in a wool tasting.

Testing new skills

They got five different wools and a chart. For each wool they were to make an initial assessment of the wool – what was their immediate feeling of the wool?

A person filling in a chart. Yarn samples are attached to the chart.
A lot of dedication was invested in the wool tasting.

They prepared and spun the wool and made a sample, taking notes of preparation method, spinning technique and spindle type. For every wool they got fifteen minutes. The room was quiet and the air thick with concentration. They were all dedicated and knew exactly how they wanted to prepare and spin the different wools and made thorough notes. It was a joy to observe!

A filled-in chart with yarn samples attached to it.
Want to know the wools in the wool tasting? From the left: Norwegian NKS, Dalapäls wool, Svärdsjö wool, Gute wool and Huacaya alpaca.

So much of what they had learned during the week came in use in the wool tasting. They had been provided with lots of tools and in the wool tasting they proved that they knew how to use them.

Spinning meditation

The last thing we did before lunch and journeys homeward was a spinning meditation. I hadn’t planned it, but one of the student had taken one of my previous courses where we had had a spinning meditation and asked if we could do it again. And it was a very suitable finale of a wonderful week.

A woman knitting on a bench. A meadow in the background.
A bench, some yarn and a meadow. The simplest things in life can be the most powerful.

Spinning, especially on spindles, can be truly meditative and is one of the superpowers of the craft. For me, a spindle a day keeps me balanced and focused. Perhaps it also keeps the doctor away.

Happy spinning!


You can follow me in several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course! You can also check out my course page for courses in Sweden.
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. Shooting and editing a 3 minute video takes about 5 hours. Writing a blog post around 3. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Course launch Day!

Today is Course Launch Day! The cart is now open and you can enroll in the Course Spin on a supported spindle! Pick your pricing tier and enroll now! The prices are limited to the first five days. After Wednesday I will raise the prices. So for a lower price, the time to enroll is now.

Pricing plans for the online course Spin on a supported spindle
The pricing plans (no link, you need to go to the course page to enroll)

This is how you do it:

  1. Click this link to get to the course page.
  2. Click on the big red enroll button
  3. Choose your pricing plan.
  4. Enter your payment information and you are on your way!

Make sure to check your spam filter for lost emails!

In every part of the course you have the opportunity to ask me questions in the comments section. I’ll try to answer as quickly as possible.

For more information about the course, look in last week’s blog post.

A big thank you to everyone who has supported me on my blogYouTube channelInstagramFacebook and Patreon. You help me become a better spinner, teacher and course creator.

I’ll see you in the course!

Happy spinning.

Josefin

P.S. Don’t forget the live webinar tonight at 5 pm CET (world clock here)!

motionmailapp.com

You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

A new online course

A new online course: Spin on a supported spindle

I have been hinting about a new online course for a while and now it is finally happening! This Saturday, March 2nd, I will launch the online course Spin on a supported spindle – a comprehensive step-by-step guide to spinning on a supported spindle with confidence. Read about the course here and register for the live webinar!

Spinning on a supported spindle, a new online course

Spinning on a supported spindle is something that lies very close to my heart. Supported spindle spinning may be my most favorite spinning technique and also the technique I have been teaching for the last 2,5 years. Through my classes I have seen the most common mistakes and beginner’s struggles. In the online course I try to address these issues to give you as many tools as possible to learn how to spin continuously and effortlessly.

The superpowers of supported spindle spinning

This technique has so many superpowers and I will go through each one in the course. With supported spindle spinning you can

  • spin in different places than other spinning techniques
  • experiment
  • spin in crowded places
  • focus on quality
  • spin very short fibers
  • find inner balance
  • spin faster than with other spindle techniques
  • produce a yarn that is extremely thin
  • spin with more ease and less strain than many other techniques

Meditative

One of the most compelling traits of supported spindle spinning is that it is meditative. That is true for many spinning techniques, but there is something extra special about the rhythm of supported spindle spinning. If I feel stressed I often take a supported spindle and spin for a while. It lets my brain rest and find balance.

Spinning on a supported spindle is truly meditative
Spinning on a supported spindle is truly meditative

Quality

Another one of the most powerful features of supported spindle spinning is that you can focus on the quality in a way that no other spinning technique allows. With supported spindle spinning you have a 100 % control over drafting and tension. Your hands control both fiber and yarn and at a distance from your eyes that allows you to carefully watch and feel what is happening in the drafting zone. This means that you are able to study the behaviour of the wool closely achieve the result you want right there, between your hands.

Less strain

Many people say that supported spindle spinning puts less strain on arms and shoulders than other types of spinning. When you spin on a supported spindle you move your arms minimally. That means that arms and shoulders can rest in the motion and your fingers will do the work with the help of low friction against a smooth bowl surface.

I had one student who had constant pains after a car accident. Some spinning techniques were difficult for her to do for longer periods of time due to the pain. But after the course she said that she could spin on a supported spindle for hours. It really warmed my heart to hear and I was truly happy for her.

Course design

In the course I will walk you through supported spindle spinning step by step. Everything in the course is video-based so that you can see what I do. There are 4 sections and 11 theoretical and practical lessons. All the lessons are captioned and there are informative titles for important keywords and concepts. I have also included a glossary pdf so the you can look up important terms during the course.

Course outline

In the course we will look at

  • Getting to know your spindle: We get acquainted with the spindle and look at why we spin on a supported spindle
  • Yarn exercises: With step-by-step exercises with yarn we isolate the movements and learn movements, hand positions and yarn angles without having to manage fiber and drafting at the same time. We also look at spindle anatomy and differences in models and design.
  • Managing fiber and technique: We spin with fiber and practice park and draft at our own pace. We also dive a bit deeper in technique.
  • Spinning continuously: We let go of the last preparational exercises and learn how to spin continuously.
outline of the course Spin on a supported spindle
The outline of the course

Material requirements

To be able to take the course you need just a few things:

  • A supported spindle. If you don’t have one you can take my free course How to pick a supported spindle and bowl to find out which model that will work best for you.
  • A spindle bowl. This could be a special spinning bowl or a household bowl with a smooth surface.
  • A piece of yarn for the yarn exercises.
  • Fiber to spin with. Pick a fiber that you are comfortable with.

Who can take the course?

To make the most of this course you will need to know how to spin on a suspended (drop) spindle and be comfortable with spinning on a suspended spindle. You need to know how wool and fiber behave and how a spindle behaves. You can still take the course if you don’t know this. However, I think you will get the most out of the course if you do know how to spin on a suspended spindle and that you are comfortable with spinning on a suspended spindle.


When you have finished the course you will know

  • why we spin on a supported spindle
  • the basic movements and techniques of spinning with a supported spindle 
  • why we do what we do in supported spindle spinning

With practice you will learn how to spin continuously with a supported spindle.

The course will be available in my online school this Saturday March the 2nd.

Live webinar: Spindle ergonomics

This Saturday, March 2nd at 5 pm CET, I will host a live webinar. I will talk about spindle ergonomics and how we can adjust our spinning to avoid pain and strain. I will also talk about the online course.

This is a chance for me to meet you (in the chat at least, I won’t be able to see you) and for you to see me live and unedited. I am terrified about this but also very excited. And I know you will be kind webinar participants and not eat me alive.

The webinar has already taken place

Happy spinning!

You can follow me on several social media:


  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Online course

I have no spinning video for you today. Instead I have

my very first online course!

I can finally come closer to you all and be a part of your spinning process.

Free course!

The first online course I offer is a course in how to pick a supported spindle and bowl. Here is a link to the course,

How to pick a supported spindle and bowl – a quick guide to finding your best supported spindle and bowl in three steps

This course is free and always will be. I have taught lots of in-person classes in supported spindle spinning and I know it is difficult to find a supported spindle that is right for an individual spinner’s personal spinning preferences and context. Want to see the promo?

How to pick a supported spindle and bowl

So, I chose to make the free course about picking a supported spindle and bowl. Many students have come to me with their own supported spindles and many times these haven’t been very good spinning tools. But how are they supposed to know a good supported spindle from a not-so-good one? In the course I have put together my experience as a teacher of supported spindle spinning to help you find your best supported spindle and bowl. This is also a good course even if you are an experienced supported spindle spinner. Take the course and see if your spindle(s) and bowl(s) are the best for you.

In the course I will take you through the process of finding your best supported spindle and bowl in three steps:

  • What to look for in a supported spindle and bowl – important features for good spinning quality and considerations based on your own spinning context
  • Where to find supported spindles and bowls – on- or offline
  • How to make a decision – which one to buy once you have found a few you like.

A spindle and bowl
How to find your best supported spindle and bowl!

The course creation process

There are lots of things to think about when creating an online course. I have made several mistakes along the way and learned a lot from them.

I have the curriculum from my in-person courses, but not everything is translatable to an online setting. With online students I can’t do any hands-on guidance or live interaction, but I can use the medium to my advantage with slow motion clips, close-ups, guiding titles and lots of editing.

I chose to make as much of the content both auditive, visual and text-based to accommodate as many learning processes as possible. Obviously I talk through the course and show your what I do, but I have also added key words in text. There is a pdf version of the course if you like that better.

Captions

The most time-consuming part of the video-making is the captioning. You can pay someone else to do the captions for you, but I can’t afford that yet (but it will definitely be the first thing I’ll outsource when I can). First I need to transcribe everything I say, which takes a lot of time and focus. Then I obsess over seeing my colloquial language in writing – it looks horrible. After that I need to create all the caption segments, add the captions and match them to the timeline. Lots of fidgeting with milliseconds, but it is all worth it. English is not my first language, just as it is not for many of my followers, so I think it will make the course more inclusive. And I really like the result!

I had some trouble making the captions closed (so that the viewer can choose whether to have the captions on or off), so to spare myself some grief, I finally decided to burn them in. If there is a demand for closed captions, I’ll see what I can do for future courses.

The setting

The course was shot in my childhood home, where my parents still live. The kitchen bench I’m sitting on used to be my mother’s bed when she was a child. My parents were out of town when I shot the video, so I borrowed their dining room and made some interior decorating adjustments. The room has lots of windows in three directions, so there was a beautiful flow of daylight in the room. Also, there was no annoying airplane noise (which there is at our home). I really like this setting and I hope I can borrow it again on another online course shooting day.

Josefin Waltin sitting oh a kitchen bench with spindles in her hands.
Video, audio, key words and captions to match as many learning styles as possible.

Spread the word

So go ahead and take the course! Even if you are not planning on buying any supported spindles for a while – it gives you a chance to see what my courses are like. And if you know someone that might be interested in the course, spread the word. Since my work from now on most likely will be considered self promotion I doubt that I can link to my channels on Facebook forums with rules against “soft sell”.  Subscribe to this blog, my YouTube channel, facebook page and Instagram and share these channels to make sure you or your spinning friends don’t miss anything.

Enroll in the course and let me know what you think!

Josefin Waltin sitting on a kitchen bench.
Come and enroll in the course!

Happy spinning!


You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!