Community

"Every revolution of the wheel spins peace, goodwill and love". Mahatma Gandhi

Community: A group of people living in the same place or having a particular characteristic in common (Oxford dictionaries)

A particular characteristic in common. Communities thrive all over the world and all over the Internet, full of creativity and passion for the particular characteristic. There is something extraordinary about the spinning community, though. I have never seen such a beautiful fellowship of people who are so eager to help and support each other. I have never seen an unkind word directed to another spinner in the spinning community. Everybody is eager to help, from beginner to expert and from all fields of the spinning spectrum. There is a true foundation of, well, actually peace, love and understanding.

Peace

Spinning doesn’t agree with unkindness. Spinning is by nature a peaceful act. With our hands we fuse fibers together in the cooperative motion of creating yarn. The hands work together to get the fibers to work together and align themselves in the draft. They may be sleek and consistent or bumpy and wild, but they are nonetheless yarn. It is like we spin our own community of fibers. We spin togetherness.

"Every revolution of the wheel spins peace, goodwill and love". Mahatma Gandhi
“Every revolution of the wheel spins peace, goodwill and love”. Mahatma Gandhi. Embroidered quote on my shopping trolley.

The spinning community is for me a safe place. I know I can ask any question and get a thoughtful answer. I embrace the new knowledge and I feel humble towards the spinner who taught me something new and valuable. The act of helping a fellow spinner, new or experienced, is and act of peace. When I help another spinner I know my reward will be more peace in the world. The more I learn about spinning the more I respect the people who make up this community. And I know that the learning and inspiration never end.

Love

In the spinning community we share our knowledge. Because knowledge of spinning is also knowledge of what spinning gives us in return. I know about the transition in my body when I sit down and spin after a busy day. I know about the feeling of flow and weightlessness when I get into the creative bubble. And I know that I can give that feeling to another spinner when I help them develop or solve a problem.

Spinning has been a cultural heritage since someone took some cellulose fiber, tied it around a rock, set it in motion and realized what it could result in. Too many crafting techniques have been lost and forgotten, even in the spinning world. I feel a responsibility to help saving endangered textile techniques. That is the reason why I wanted to learn techniques like nalbinding and twined knitting. They had almost been forgotten.

Recently one of my videos was spread in a non-spinning context. In less than two weeks it grew from 600 to over 25000 (!) views and people commented on the cultural heritage of spinning. There is obviously a surge for old techniques and natural materials. We need to cherish these old techniques, develop them and make them a thriving and natural part of our contemporary life.

Understanding

There are so many kind souls out there, sharing their knowledge, understanding the love of the craft. We share something unique. We share the understanding of what spinning gives us and the world. As spinners you know what I need without me having to necessarily tell you. And every now and then I know what you need. It is a mutual understanding of what spinning gives us.

Barbro who unprovoked gave me her long and loving list of spinning literature. Anna who offered to send me copies of rare spinning books. Kate who seems to know what the spinning part of my mind is trying to figure out and always asks the right questions at the right time. Gunilla who is the fastest book sender in the world. Jenny who cheers me on and referred me to another fiber enthusiast. Kirsten who offered to send me fiber that was new to me. Björn who makes the best supported spindles. All my Teachable colleagues who cheered me on after my course launch. Fran, Grace, Babs, Rebecca and all my students and followers who reach out and help me become a better spinner and teacher.

All these people are to varying degrees a part of the spinning and fiber world and understand the beauty of it.

Yesterday was International Women’s Day. So many women have worked so hard with textile crafts to provide warmth and shelter for their families, and so often unpaid (for an elaboration of the value of textile crafts, see my previous post on calculations). We can give something back to them by celebrating, treasuring and developing textile techniques.

To all women who have worked hard to provide for their families
To all women who have worked hard to provide for their families

Sharing

I have so many ideas I want to share with you. Because when I share, you share and when you share I share. With that we all grow as spinners and people and once again 1 + 1 = 3. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole.

Webinars

When I launched my new online course a week ago I hosted a live webinar on spindle ergonomics. I was very nervous the whole day and totally drained afterwards, but the webinar turned out a success. So many of you cheered me on before, during and after the webinar and you seem to have genuinely enjoyed it. The best comment came from my 16-year-old son, though: “Mum, it actually sounded like a real live stream!”.

It felt so good to be there live with you. Editing is a powerful tool – I can edit away any flaws in videos, courses and blog posts, but it was also a liberating feeling to be totally unedited with you. A webinar is also as close as I can get to meeting you in person.

I plan to make more webinars and I have lots of ideas. It is a medium I believe in and that I think would work very well in the spinning community. I learn a lot from making them and I hope you learn something new too by participating in them. Together we can create a forum that will work and contribute to the community. If there is a special topic you would like me to address in a webinar, just let me know. You can contact me via any of the links below or via email if you are on my email list.


Thank you for all the peace, love and understanding that make up this beautiful spinning community.

Happy spinning!


You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better content. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Course launch Day!

Today is Course Launch Day! The cart is now open and you can enroll in the Course Spin on a supported spindle! Pick your pricing tier and enroll now! The prices are limited to the first five days. After Wednesday I will raise the prices. So for a lower price, the time to enroll is now.

Pricing plans for the online course Spin on a supported spindle
The pricing plans (no link, you need to go to the course page to enroll)

This is how you do it:

  1. Click this link to get to the course page.
  2. Click on the big red enroll button
  3. Choose your pricing plan.
  4. Enter your payment information and you are on your way!

Make sure to check your spam filter for lost emails!

In every part of the course you have the opportunity to ask me questions in the comments section. I’ll try to answer as quickly as possible.

For more information about the course, look in last week’s blog post.

A big thank you to everyone who has supported me on my blogYouTube channelInstagramFacebook and Patreon. You help me become a better spinner, teacher and course creator.

I’ll see you in the course!

Happy spinning.

Josefin

P.S. Don’t forget the live webinar tonight at 5 pm CET (world clock here)!

motionmailapp.com

You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

A new online course

A new online course: Spin on a supported spindle

I have been hinting about a new online course for a while and now it is finally happening! This Saturday, March 2nd, I will launch the online course Spin on a supported spindle – a comprehensive step-by-step guide to spinning on a supported spindle with confidence. Read about the course here and register for the live webinar!

Spinning on a supported spindle, a new online course

Spinning on a supported spindle is something that lies very close to my heart. Supported spindle spinning may be my most favorite spinning technique and also the technique I have been teaching for the last 2,5 years. Through my classes I have seen the most common mistakes and beginner’s struggles. In the online course I try to address these issues to give you as many tools as possible to learn how to spin continuously and effortlessly.

The superpowers of supported spindle spinning

This technique has so many superpowers and I will go through each one in the course. With supported spindle spinning you can

  • spin in different places than other spinning techniques
  • experiment
  • spin in crowded places
  • focus on quality
  • spin very short fibers
  • find inner balance
  • spin faster than with other spindle techniques
  • produce a yarn that is extremely thin
  • spin with more ease and less strain than many other techniques

Meditative

One of the most compelling traits of supported spindle spinning is that it is meditative. That is true for many spinning techniques, but there is something extra special about the rhythm of supported spindle spinning. If I feel stressed I often take a supported spindle and spin for a while. It lets my brain rest and find balance.

Spinning on a supported spindle is truly meditative
Spinning on a supported spindle is truly meditative

Quality

Another one of the most powerful features of supported spindle spinning is that you can focus on the quality in a way that no other spinning technique allows. With supported spindle spinning you have a 100 % control over drafting and tension. Your hands control both fiber and yarn and at a distance from your eyes that allows you to carefully watch and feel what is happening in the drafting zone. This means that you are able to study the behaviour of the wool closely achieve the result you want right there, between your hands.

Less strain

Many people say that supported spindle spinning puts less strain on arms and shoulders than other types of spinning. When you spin on a supported spindle you move your arms minimally. That means that arms and shoulders can rest in the motion and your fingers will do the work with the help of low friction against a smooth bowl surface.

I had one student who had constant pains after a car accident. Some spinning techniques were difficult for her to do for longer periods of time due to the pain. But after the course she said that she could spin on a supported spindle for hours. It really warmed my heart to hear and I was truly happy for her.

Course design

In the course I will walk you through supported spindle spinning step by step. Everything in the course is video-based so that you can see what I do. There are 4 sections and 11 theoretical and practical lessons. All the lessons are captioned and there are informative titles for important keywords and concepts. I have also included a glossary pdf so the you can look up important terms during the course.

Course outline

In the course we will look at

  • Getting to know your spindle: We get acquainted with the spindle and look at why we spin on a supported spindle
  • Yarn exercises: With step-by-step exercises with yarn we isolate the movements and learn movements, hand positions and yarn angles without having to manage fiber and drafting at the same time. We also look at spindle anatomy and differences in models and design.
  • Managing fiber and technique: We spin with fiber and practice park and draft at our own pace. We also dive a bit deeper in technique.
  • Spinning continuously: We let go of the last preparational exercises and learn how to spin continuously.
outline of the course Spin on a supported spindle
The outline of the course

Material requirements

To be able to take the course you need just a few things:

  • A supported spindle. If you don’t have one you can take my free course How to pick a supported spindle and bowl to find out which model that will work best for you.
  • A spindle bowl. This could be a special spinning bowl or a household bowl with a smooth surface.
  • A piece of yarn for the yarn exercises.
  • Fiber to spin with. Pick a fiber that you are comfortable with.

Who can take the course?

To make the most of this course you will need to know how to spin on a suspended (drop) spindle and be comfortable with spinning on a suspended spindle. You need to know how wool and fiber behave and how a spindle behaves. You can still take the course if you don’t know this. However, I think you will get the most out of the course if you do know how to spin on a suspended spindle and that you are comfortable with spinning on a suspended spindle.


When you have finished the course you will know

  • why we spin on a supported spindle
  • the basic movements and techniques of spinning with a supported spindle 
  • why we do what we do in supported spindle spinning

With practice you will learn how to spin continuously with a supported spindle.

The course will be available in my online school this Saturday March the 2nd.

Live webinar: Spindle ergonomics

This Saturday, March 2nd at 5 pm CET, I will host a live webinar. I will talk about spindle ergonomics and how we can adjust our spinning to avoid pain and strain. I will also talk about the online course.

This is a chance for me to meet you (in the chat at least, I won’t be able to see you) and for you to see me live and unedited. I am terrified about this but also very excited. And I know you will be kind webinar participants and not eat me alive.

The webinar has already taken place

Happy spinning!

You can follow me on several social media:


  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

To do-list

Trying to sort out thoughts, ideas, musts, need tos and want tos.

There is a lot going on now. I need to make a to do-list and try to sort out my thoughts, ideas, musts and want tos.

Trying to sort out thoughts, ideas, musts, need tos and want tos.
Trying to sort out thoughts, ideas, musts, need tos and want tos.

Design from fleece to garment blog series

There was a lot of attention on my latest post on calculations. So many people seem to have heard that question before, “will you knit me a sweater? I’ll pay for the material cost.” Apparently, it is an important discussion – about the value of women’s work, the appreciation and recognition of hand crafted items and the history of textile production. The post has been shared over a thousand times and it has been read by ever 3500 people in all continents in just a few days. That is amazing and totally overwhelming.

 The response from followers to the Design from fleece to garment blog series was overwhelming
The response from followers to the Design from fleece to garment blog series was overwhelming

Overwhelmed

That’s how I feel right now, overwhelmed. I am thrilled that so many people read the post. I am so happy that so many people recognized the frustration of investing so much time and love into a craft that few people understand the skills behind. But I’m also exhausted by the attention. Overwhelming does that to a highly sensitive person.

A lot of people liked the sweater too (and the whole blog series). And world of wool linked to the sweater in their newsletter, fancy that! Many people asked for a pattern for the sweater and I will make one. Soon. When I have had some time to breathe.

Online courses

Over 200 people have taken the free course in How to pick a supported spindle and bowl! I have got so many lovely reviews. People really like the structure of the course. The most interesting concept in the course has been the shape of the upper spinning tip and its impact of ergonomics.

I should launch my new course soon. Just need to check a few technical stuff first. I wonder if anyone would come if I did a live webinar. I should ask my followers. Hosting a live webinar would most definitely be really scary, but I think it will be good for me. Not everything can be edited and well polished.

Thoughts about the upcoming online course launch and future online course topics
Thoughts about the upcoming online course launch and future online course topics

Oh, and I need to ask the students of the free course to check their spam filters. Perhaps my emails have got caught there.

I wonder what course I will make next. Perhaps my followers have suggestions and requests? Navajo spindle spinning, supported spindle spinning, consistency, fiber preparation? Yeah, that would be the best thing, to ask them. After all, it is for my followers I make the courses, they should know what courses they want. Perhaps they want the opportunity to get a private video coaching session? That would be so cool!

Secret articles

It feels good that secret article 1 is finished. It will be published soon, that’s so cool! Gotta get to work on secret article 2 too, and especially secret pattern x, that will be a challenge. I need to plan the photo shoots too. I’ll put the pattern, the article and the photo shoots on top of the to do-list. Secret pattern y can wait a while. I don’t think it will be a very complicated one to write, though.

Lots of secret stuff going on!
Lots of secret stuff going on!

Planning the video season

Video shooting season starts soon. Well, depending on when spring will really come. We’re still in mid-winter. But I do have some material from last summer that I haven’t released. I should edit them before I start shooting new videos. And there is that secret video project coming up in May, together with my spinning friends A and M. That will be a lot of fun!

Planning the video season
Planning the video season

Courses in spring and summer

I have two in-person courses to plan too. The supported spindle course series in Stockholm in March and the five-day course at Sätergläntan in July! I like the concept – a spindle a day. Just got to figure out how to bring all the different spindle types for all the students on the train.

Planning the spring and summer spinning courses
Planning the spring and summer spinning courses

I really need to spin. Need as in my mind needs the serenity and time to recharge. And to get in a mode of creative thinking. Yeah, that’s what I’ll do right now, by the fireplace.

Do I have to go to work on Monday? If it is too slippery to take the bike I can knit on the metro! And knitting at coffee breaks is always a conversation starter.

Knitting for a secret pattern
Knitting for secret pattern y

Happy spinning!


You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
    If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Online course

I have no spinning video for you today. Instead I have

my very first online course!

I can finally come closer to you all and be a part of your spinning process.

Free course!

The first online course I offer is a course in how to pick a supported spindle and bowl. Here is a link to the course,

How to pick a supported spindle and bowl – a quick guide to finding your best supported spindle and bowl in three steps

This course is free and always will be. I have taught lots of in-person classes in supported spindle spinning and I know it is difficult to find a supported spindle that is right for an individual spinner’s personal spinning preferences and context. Want to see the promo?

How to pick a supported spindle and bowl

So, I chose to make the free course about picking a supported spindle and bowl. Many students have come to me with their own supported spindles and many times these haven’t been very good spinning tools. But how are they supposed to know a good supported spindle from a not-so-good one? In the course I have put together my experience as a teacher of supported spindle spinning to help you find your best supported spindle and bowl. This is also a good course even if you are an experienced supported spindle spinner. Take the course and see if your spindle(s) and bowl(s) are the best for you.

In the course I will take you through the process of finding your best supported spindle and bowl in three steps:

  • What to look for in a supported spindle and bowl – important features for good spinning quality and considerations based on your own spinning context
  • Where to find supported spindles and bowls – on- or offline
  • How to make a decision – which one to buy once you have found a few you like.

A spindle and bowl
How to find your best supported spindle and bowl!

The course creation process

There are lots of things to think about when creating an online course. I have made several mistakes along the way and learned a lot from them.

I have the curriculum from my in-person courses, but not everything is translatable to an online setting. With online students I can’t do any hands-on guidance or live interaction, but I can use the medium to my advantage with slow motion clips, close-ups, guiding titles and lots of editing.

I chose to make as much of the content both auditive, visual and text-based to accommodate as many learning processes as possible. Obviously I talk through the course and show your what I do, but I have also added key words in text. There is a pdf version of the course if you like that better.

Captions

The most time-consuming part of the video-making is the captioning. You can pay someone else to do the captions for you, but I can’t afford that yet (but it will definitely be the first thing I’ll outsource when I can). First I need to transcribe everything I say, which takes a lot of time and focus. Then I obsess over seeing my colloquial language in writing – it looks horrible. After that I need to create all the caption segments, add the captions and match them to the timeline. Lots of fidgeting with milliseconds, but it is all worth it. English is not my first language, just as it is not for many of my followers, so I think it will make the course more inclusive. And I really like the result!

I had some trouble making the captions closed (so that the viewer can choose whether to have the captions on or off), so to spare myself some grief, I finally decided to burn them in. If there is a demand for closed captions, I’ll see what I can do for future courses.

The setting

The course was shot in my childhood home, where my parents still live. The kitchen bench I’m sitting on used to be my mother’s bed when she was a child. My parents were out of town when I shot the video, so I borrowed their dining room and made some interior decorating adjustments. The room has lots of windows in three directions, so there was a beautiful flow of daylight in the room. Also, there was no annoying airplane noise (which there is at our home). I really like this setting and I hope I can borrow it again on another online course shooting day.

Josefin Waltin sitting oh a kitchen bench with spindles in her hands.
Video, audio, key words and captions to match as many learning styles as possible.

Spread the word

So go ahead and take the course! Even if you are not planning on buying any supported spindles for a while – it gives you a chance to see what my courses are like. And if you know someone that might be interested in the course, spread the word. Since my work from now on most likely will be considered self promotion I doubt that I can link to my channels on Facebook forums with rules against “soft sell”.  Subscribe to this blog, my YouTube channel, facebook page and Instagram and share these channels to make sure you or your spinning friends don’t miss anything.

Enroll in the course and let me know what you think!

Josefin Waltin sitting on a kitchen bench.
Come and enroll in the course!

Happy spinning!


You can follow me on several social media:

  • This blog is my main channel. This is where I write posts about spinning, but also where I explain a bit more about videos I release. Sometimes I make videos that are on the blog only. Subscribe or make an rss feed to be sure not to miss any posts.
  • My youtube channel is where I release a lot of my videos. Subscribe to be sure not to miss anything!
  • I have a facebook page where I link to all my blog posts, you are welcome to follow me there.
  • I run an online spinning school, welcome to join a course!
  • On Patreon you can get early access to new videos and other Patreon only benefits. The contributions from my patrons is an important way to cover the costs, time and energy I put into the videos and blog posts I create. The content I create is totally free from advertisement. You can read more about my Patreon page here.
  • Follow me on Instagram.  I announce new blog posts, share images from behind the scenes and post lots of woolliness.
  • In all the social media I offer, you are more than welcome to contact me. Interacting with you helps me make better posts and videos. My private Facebook page, however, will remain private.
  • If you like what I do, please tell all your fiber friends and share these links!

Shopping trolley makeover

A person pulling a shopping trolley

I have a shopping trolley that I pack all my gear in when I teach spinning. It is lightweight and easy to bring on the metro or train. It can easily swallow three shoe boxes on top of each other, filled with spindles, cards, combs and other tools. This is the story of a shopping trolley makeover.

A shopping trolley makeover

Lately my shopping trolley bag has started to come apart and I decided it was time for it to retire. My husband suggested I look for a new one in wool. That was an excellent idea. The one I had was in some synthetic canvas which wasn’t climate friendly at all. When I browsed for a shopping trolley in wool, though, I couldn’t find one.

Creativity by bike

On an early bike ride to work I got an idea.  My 10 K morning bike ride to work is one of my most creative moments during the day and I usually get so much sorted out in my head on these rides. I direct and edit videos, brainstorm for new videos, outline articles and blog posts etc. When I get to work I just write all of it down and e-mail it to myself. This was one of those ideas. I was going to make a new trolley bag myself – I would just copy all the parts and measurements from the existing trolley bag and stitch them together.

I had seen a made-over shopping trolley before and fallen in love with the idea. A while ago, I took a wood-carving class, and the teacher had upcycled her shopping trolley. Instead of the regular canvas bag she had made one in woven birch bark. The handle was made of carefully carved wood with an ergonomical grip. It was really beautiful and personal. The idea of making one in my own crafting material made my heart jump with joy.

Wool needle punched felt

On a recent fiber event I passed by a vendor who sold needle punched felt in 100 percent wool from Swedish sheep. They sold it by the meter in large rolls. That would be a perfect material for my shopping trolley!

I bought a meter of medium felted needle punched felt. The material is about 6 mm thick and quite sturdy. However, it works excellent to hand sew in.

Cozy sewing

I measured the original shopping trolley bag and copied it right off (I did leave the cane compartment, though, I figured I wouldn’t need it for a while yet). Then I just used a simple backstitch to sew all the pieces together.

The sewing was actually really comfortable. I loved holding the thick wool in my hands and the needle went through the thick material with ease. I used glue clamps to pin the pieces together. And of course I used my handspun yarn for the seams, a 2-ply worsted spun yarn from the black parts of a Shetland flecked fleece.

A woolen shopping trolley in a beech forest.
A personalized shopping trolley, ready for teaching adventures. Photo by Dan Waltin

The compartment was made of a front and a back, two sides, a bottom and a top flap. The top flap closed with velcro. There were steel reinforcement frames in the front and back pieces. I made extra pockets on the tops of the front and back pieces for the frames to fit in. A shorter handle on the back of the bag and a longer on the front. A closing mechanism for the handles, secured with velcro. Two horizontal straps on the back piece held the bag securely on the trolley. After the pictures were taken I got rid of the ugly foam handle on the trolley and replaced it with a cozier one in the same material as the rest of the bag.

All that was left of the original trolley bag was a sad and hollow bundle of polyester canvas.

Embellishments

Needle felted logo

Before I sewed the bag, though, I had some decorations to make. First of all I needle felted my logo to the front of the bag. I tried to pre-trace the logo onto the felted material first, but it was way to fuzzy, so I had to needle felt it all off the cuff. I used a handspun rya yarn I had used earlier for a logo embroidery on my spinning apron.

A needle felted sheep logo
A needle felted logo. Photo by Dan Waltin

A spinner’s quote

After having finished the logo I thought it would be a shame to waste such a blank and lovely canvas. So I embroidered a quote on the closing flap. I used the same handspun yarn I had used for the seams.

I chose a spinning quote from Mahatma Gandhi. He was a spinner and wanted to liberate India from the British by non-violent civil disobedience and spinning. I found it quite fitting.

A quote embroidered on a felted material
‘Every revolution of the wheel spins peace, goodwill and love’. Photo by Dan Waltin

I couldn’t pre-trace on the lid either, so I had to embroider all the writing off the cuff as well. I used a simple backstitch. Embroidering handwriting by improvisation was really a challenge, but when the quote was all finished I was really happy with the result. Despite the rather uneven ‘handwriting’ I am quite fond of it. It has sort of an animated touch to it.

A shopping trolley makeover success

When the shopping trolley bag was finished I just slid it over the trolley handle. I fit like a glove and I was happy as a clam of my beautiful and personal trolley bag. The walls of the bag are really sturdy and it actually looks professional. I can’t wait to board the next train with my new traveling companion!

A person pulling a shopping trolley.
Off to new spinning adventures. Photo by Dan Waltin

A spindle case

I also got another idea. It may have come to me on another bike ride. I had fallen in love with the felted material and I didn’t want to stop sewing in it. So I came up with an idea to make a spindle case. Just a tube with a bottom, a lid and a loop strap for hanging or holding in your hand or sliding onto your belt.

A woolen tube with an embroidered flower
My pretty spindle house, ready for a house-warming party. Or, rather, a spindle warming party. The house is already warm and cozy. Photo by Dan Waltin

In afterthought, the rim of the lid was a bit too short. It is 3 cm and I should have made it around 5 cm. The top of the lid is a bit too small, which makes the rim point outwards a bit and result in an unsmooth fit. I’ll make some changes for my next spindle case!

More embroidery

I have not embroidered much, but a spindle case is a perfect opportunity to practice. And I did love sewing in the material, so there was no hesitation. This time, however, I didn’t use my handspun yarn for the embroidery. Instead, I used thrift shop embroidery flax yarn I found in the back of a cupboard. This case needed colour and most of my handspun is undyed. The silky linen yarn was a perfect match to the matte and sturdy feted wool.

As in my previous embroidery adventures with the needle punched felt I couldn’t pre-trace anything, so I just started with the center ring of a flower and improvised from there. The beauty of being a beginner at something is that you don’t know the rules and I could just make everything up as I went along. And I’m quite happy with the result.

A woolen tube with an embroidered flower
Photo by Dan Waltin

The flower reminds me of a pansy. The dangling tentacles are inspired by an anglerfish. You know, the deep-water fish that has sort of an antennae on the top of its head with a flashlight on it to lure its bait.

Decadent lining

I also chose to line the spindle case, for two reasons. First of all, the spindle would get stuck in the entangled mess at the back of the embroidery without a cover. Second of all, If I would keep some spinning fiber in the case (which I most definitely would), it would stick to the felted surface if I didn’t line it. Of course I didn’t want a synthetic lining material, so I bought a decadently pink silk lining and hand-stitched it to the inside of the tube before I assembled the case.

A woolen tube with silk lining.
Decadently pink silk lining in the spindle case. Photo by Dan Waltin

As a final touch, I cut out a circle of wool to put in the case as protection. This way I can put a small spinning bowl or puck/disk in the bottom of the case. If I put the wool circle on top of the bowl and then slide in the spindle I don’t have  to worry about any damage on the spindle tip.

Josefin Waltin sitting on a log in a forest. A shopping trolley and a tube case beside her.
Wool, spinning and a beech forest in autumnal colours. Couldn’t ask for more. Photo by Dan Waltin

I’m ready for my next spinning teaching adventure!

Happy spinning!


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